Trina Calderón

Lee Quiñones at Charlie James Gallery; Credit: Michael Underwood

LEE’s Walls Speak Volumes at His First Solo Show in Los Angeles

Lee Quiñones, who greeted fame with the moniker LEE, is an originator of the New York graffiti movement. A Puerto Rican from the Lower East Side, he started painting subway cars in 1974 and emerged as one of a select group of avant-garde influencers of Wild Style graffiti in an art scene that absolutely exploded around the world. LEE puts it another way, "Before Instagram, there was InstaDammnnn!"...
Patrick Martinez in his studio; Credit: Trina Calderon

Patrick Martinez Excavates American Trauma in "Remembering to Forget" at Charlie James Gallery

“Remembering to Forget,” Martinez’s second solo show, opens Saturday, Sept. 8, at Charlie James Gallery in Chinatown. Among the authentic Los Angeles artists (born and raised in L.A.) who continue to evolve here, Martinez is making art not only for art’s sake but with society in mind; and his work may leave you thinking, why is there any American art right now without a message? L.A. Weekly spoke to Martinez on the eve of his new show, about all of this plus music, politics, police violence and, in the end, how to have hope....
Hollyweed (1976) by Dan Finegood; Credit: Courtesy Center for the Study of Political Graphics

Be Inspired to Action at the Center for the Study of Political Graphics

Political graphics are specifically made to be easy to read. Powerful, artistic and dynamic, the symbols and messages elevate ideas and pass on knowledge of the struggles that are often hidden and censored. Carol Wells, founder of the profound historical art archive Center for the Study of Political Graphics in Los Angeles, explains, "The posters function as a graphic novel, teaching viewers a history they do not learn in school."...
Extricate is Gajin Fujita's collaboration with DEFER.; Credit: Courtesy Chinese American Museum

Exhibit Explores How Hip-Hop Ideals Parallel the Asian-American Experience

American social movements have come to define our culture in the face of capitalism. In fact, it’s the cataclysmic intersections of visual art, writing and performance art that have contributed to great cultural change in the United States. Though hip-hop originated in the Bronx in the 1970s, the exhibit "Don’t Believe the Hype: L.A. Asian-Americans in Hip-Hop" documents the way the 40-year-old music movement has inspired resilience and defiance in the art created by Los Angeles' Asian-American population....