From Ice T to Ultravox: The 112th LA Weekly playlist, reviewing the musicians that we’ve been writing about all week, is live now. There’s electronic music from OLAN, pop from Spice Girls, hip-hop from Ice T and Young Devyn, punk/new wave from the Tidal Babes and Ultravox, metal from Anvil, and so much more.

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Punk Pioneer Geza X Digs Through the Garage for New Label

Geza X, left, with Rodney Bingenheimer

From Ice T to Ultravox

Also this week:

Print star Geza X told us that, “I knew there’s no real money in indie labels, especially now. I’m making $40 a month to split between 20 different artists. It’s sick. It’s an embarrassment actually, to our culture. Everybody can put out their own record yeah, but as far as monetizing it, it’s worse than the ‘70s. This has always been a labor of love for me anyway – why don’t I just start a label? I have the resources and the connections. I was able to get a really good distribution agent who works through The Orchard, which is basically Sony. I started finding acts I really wanted to put out. Things that I love. The record is set up, it’s stable and I’ve got a few records out. I love every single one of them.”

In “Not Another DJ,” OLAN said, “I want to try making songs that would make sense for a band, and I find myself progressing in that direction most of the time I love hybrid acts like Little Dragon, Bonobo, the Chemical Brothers, and even go back to bands like Phantogram often for inspiration. As long as I feel free to release anything I want I feel like I’m in a good place.”

“Different types of people are finally getting a platform and a voice to share their stories and music,” she added. “While I do feel think a lot of artists are struggling to keep things interesting when making ‘what works’ is easily accessible, I feel like that will make way for us to experiment more. I would even dare to say a lot of electronic artists are starting to revert back to sounds and live elements that inspired them to start creating, and I think that’s a great start for raw, genuine, electronic music.”

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