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In partnership with The Fresh Toast

Even if you’ve taken CBD, chances are you still have questions. We’re here to help.

Over the past couple of years, CBD products have exploded in popularity and access. They’re one of the few items that can be found in your local CVS and gas station mini-mart (although we do not recommend buying CBD from a gas station!) as well as Sephora. Despite the buzz that surrounds it, there’s still a lot of misinformation surrounding CBD, with many not quite getting a grasp on its effects.

CBD, or cannabidiol, is a cannabinoid found in the cannabis plant. While it can be consumed along with THC, it’s not psychedelic, making it more accessible to people of different ages and religious beliefs. Although more research is necessary, CBD tests have shown some promise in providing pain relief and treating mental ailments like anxiety, stress and depression.

Here are 5 of the most common questions people Google when it comes to CBD:

Is it safe?

While research on the compound is still rudimentary, CBD appears to be safe when consumed as an oil and even as medication. CBD topicals haven’t been associated with negative side effects either.

When consuming too much of CBD in oil form, some people have reported effects like diarrhea, reduced appetite, dry mouth, nausea and more. Some animal studies have also shown that CBD could harm the health of their livers, but evidence isn’t conclusive.

RELATED: What’s the Difference Between Marijuana CBD And Hemp CBD?

Is it legal?

The FDA Continues To Chase CBD Companies

Photo by Tree of Life Seeds via Pexels

RELATED: Why Is the CBD Market Exploding?

In 2018, the US Farm Bill was approved, legalizing industrial hemp. CBD products fall under a tricky legal ground; they should be legal provided they contain less than 0.3 percent of THC. If the product contains more THC than that, then it’s considered illegal on a federal level. One issue that makes this topic all the more complex is the fact that CBD is a relatively new industry, with many companies not knowing how to measure the amount of CBD and THC that’s in their products.

Is it overhyped?

Research Finds CBD Effective At Helping Dependent Users Quit Marijuana

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While some CBD users swear by their CBD products, others believe that the craze behind it is a fad. The truth lies between these two statements; while the compound can do a lot of good for some people, companies have taken advantage of the misinformation that surrounds the compound, making exaggerated statements that have no scientific proof.

While a CBD product might say that it provides relaxing effects, don’t trust products that claim that they can heal your every problem.

RELATED: Is CBD A Rising Star Or Just A Popular Fad?

Are CBD gummies effective?

Gummy Products Are Changing The Way People Think About CBD

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CBD gummies have become very popular, primarily due to how easily and discreetly they can be used. While there’s no scientific evidence that proves that they actually work, different statements from people suggest that they produce relaxing effects, especially if they’re used over long periods of time. Until there’s some scientific studies that look into their functionality, there’s no way to say if they’re effective or not. For now, they appear to be safe and delicious.

RELATED: Do CBD Gummies Actually Work?

Can you have withdrawals from using it?

Here’s What You Need To Know About Treating Joint Pain With Cannabis

Photo by Anupong Thongchan/EyeEm/Getty Images

While CBD doesn’t produce a high, it is psychoactive (not be be confused with psychedelic), meaning that it can influence your state of mind. This means that it could also potentially lead to withdrawals once usage is stopped. There are not a lot of scientific studies on this, but personal anecdotes suggest that when some users stopped using CBD, the original symptoms they were treating come back more pronounced. Otherwise, there have been no symptoms of traditional withdrawal associated with the compound.

Read more on The Fresh Toast