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Amy Nicholson

Amy Nicholson

Amy Nicholson is chief film critic for L.A. Weekly. Her reviews and stories appear in all Voice Media Group publications, and she co-hosts the weekly Voice Film Club podcast. Nicholson holds a double B.A. in film studies and anthropology from the University of Oklahoma as well as a master’s in professional writing from USC. Her criticism has been recognized by the Los Angeles Press Club and the Association of Alternative Newsmedia, and her first book, Tom Cruise: Anatomy of an Actor, was recently published by Cahiers du Cinema. Reach her on Twitter at @theamynicholson.

Popular Stories

Latest Stories

  • 5 days ago | Film Reviews

    Avengers: Age of Ultron is a complicated, ticking machine — a cuckoo clock under attack. Returning helmer Joss Whedon is earnestly trying to make a movie out of a bag of bolts: six stars, nine cameos and three enemies, plus at least 10 films to go...

  • Avengers: Age of Ultron is a complicated, ticking machine -- a cuckoo clock under attack. Returning helmer Joss Whedon is earnestly trying to make a movie out of a bag of bolts: six stars, nine cameos, three enemies, and at least ten films...

  • 6 days ago | Film and TV

    Holden Caulfield, the original hipster, was a jerk at the movies. He hated them. He thought actors were phonies, screenwriters were prostitutes, and audiences who sniffled during weepies were “mean bastards at heart.” Holden wasn't a sucker. He wa...

  • 12 days ago | Film Reviews

    I dread explaining man-child dramedies to the ghosts of the dead. "You see, Grandpa, after your time, a generation paralyzed by the economy and indecision stopped growing up — and started churning out indie movies justifying it." In the 1940s, men...

  • I dread explaining man-child dramedies to the ghosts of the dead. "You see, Grandpa, after your time, a generation paralyzed by the economy and indecision stopped growing up -- and started churning out indie movies justifying why not." Movies...

  • 19 days ago | Film Reviews

    A normal movie ends with the American Humane Association's assurance that "No animals were harmed." But Tippi Hedren's doomed 1981 obsession Roar isn't normal. The AHA's seal is the first thing on screen — yet, if the authorities had a safety code...