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Watch a 400-Foot-Long Tunneling Machine Break Through a New Downtown L.A. Subway Station


Credit: Ted Soqui/Metro Los AngelesCredit: Ted Soqui/Metro Los AngelesCredit: Ted Soqui/Metro Los AngelesCredit: Ted Soqui/Metro Los AngelesMetro Los Angeles" data-rightCaption="Credit: Ted Soqui/Metro Los Angeles">Meet the Los Angeles regional connector tunnel boring machine (TBM) nicknamed Angeli.; Credit: Metro Los AngelesCredit: Ted Soqui/Metro Los AngelesOne hundred ten feet below the surface of downtown Los AngelesCredit: Ted Soqui/Metro Los Angeles40-foot-long tunnel boring machine was at work.Credit: Ted Soqui/Metro Los AngelesI could feel and hear her thumping and tearing through the soil like an ancient Jurassic beast. You could feel it in your feet.Credit: Ted Soqui/Metro Los AngelesShe was scheduled to arrive at 8:30 a.m. but was running late.Credit: Ted Soqui/Metro Los AngelesSomething tells me Angeli was on her own schedule and no one could really predict what time a 1Credit: Ted Soqui/Metro Los AngelesSomething tells me Angeli was on her own schedule and no one could really predict what time a 1Credit: Ted Soqui/Metro Los Angelesbut in fact she did.Credit: Ted Soqui/Metro Los AngelesFinallyCredit: Ted Soqui/Metro Los AngelesFinallyCredit: Ted Soqui/Metro Los AngelesmudCredit: Ted Soqui/Metro Los Angeles

Deep below downtown Los Angeles, Angeli is hard at work. She's not an ordinary member of Metro's team; she's a 400-foot-long, 21.6-foot-wide tunnel boring machine (TBM) that has been digging a new Regional Connector under the city. The project kicked off in Little Tokyo four months ago and on Thursday, Angeli's journey ended at the Grand Avenue/Bunker Hill station, where she dramatically broke through her last piece of earth. Check out L.A. Weekly photographer Ted Soqui's photo essay documenting the final stop of Angeli's underground adventure.

LA Weekly