fbpx

According to Eataly head pastry chef Katia Delogu, culinary legend has it that tiramisu was invented in Treviso, a small city in the romantic region of Veneto, supposedly to help caffeinate the Venetian lovers.

“While tiramisu is a classic Italian dessert all year round, there is something special about eating it on Valentine’s Day,” Delogu tells L.A. Weekly. “If you are having a Valentine’s Day date night at home, this beloved dessert is the perfect balance of coffee and sweetness to finish off a home-cooked meal.  One of the key components for a great tiramisu is in the mascarpone mixture — whipping egg whites and heavy cream is truly a labor of love. Top it with a generous sprinkle of cocoa powder, pair it with an after-dinner espresso or glass of sweet wine and you have a romantic ending to any La Festa di San Valentino.”

The Italian “pick me up” is also available at the Eataly marketplace in Century City for grab and go:

Tiramisu (Courtesy Eataly)

Tiramisù Classico (Traditional Tiramisu Recipe)

Recipe courtesy of Eataly head pastry chef Katia Delogu

Yield: 10 servings

Separate the egg yolks from the whites into two different bowls.

Stir the yolks with the sugar and mascarpone until the mixture is pale and sugar dissolved. Separately, whip the egg whites until stiff peaks form. Using a wooden spoon, gently fold the egg whites into the mascarpone mixture, and then gently fold in the whipped heavy cream.

Pour the coffee into a wide bowl, and quickly dunk each cookie into it. Arrange about half of the cookies so that they completely cover the base of a shallow (1½-inch deep) rectangular (11-by 7- inch) dish. Cover the cookies with half of the mascarpone mixture.

Arrange another layer of soaked cookies, and top with remaining mascarpone mixture. Sprinkle with cocoa powder on top.

Cover the dish with plastic wrap, and refrigerate for 4 hours before serving.