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The Cannibal's Meat-centric Menu Is Eye-Candy for Carnivores


General Tso pig’s head; Credit: Anne FishbeinGeneral Tso pig’s head; Credit: Anne FishbeinGeneral Tso pig’s head; Credit: Anne FishbeinGeneral Tso pig’s head; Credit: Anne FishbeinSlices of country ham; Credit: Anne FishbeinGeneral Tso pig’s head; Credit: Anne FishbeinCutting ribs in the meat room; Credit: Anne FishbeinGeneral Tso pig’s head; Credit: Anne FishbeinRib-eye in the case; Credit: Anne FishbeinGeneral Tso pig’s head; Credit: Anne FishbeinThe Cannibal burgerGeneral Tso pig’s head; Credit: Anne FishbeinThe Cannibal burgerGeneral Tso pig’s head; Credit: Anne FishbeinThe Cannibal burgerGeneral Tso pig’s head; Credit: Anne FishbeinThe Cannibal burgerGeneral Tso pig’s head; Credit: Anne FishbeinThe Cannibal burgerGeneral Tso pig’s head; Credit: Anne FishbeinThe Cannibal burgerGeneral Tso pig’s head; Credit: Anne FishbeinThe Cannibal burgerGeneral Tso pig’s head; Credit: Anne FishbeinThe Cannibal burgerGeneral Tso pig’s head; Credit: Anne Fishbein

The Cannibal Beer & Butcher — the newish Culver City outpost of the popular New York City restaurant and butcher shop — puts an emphasis on meat, a movement shared by a growing number of restaurants eschewing the vegetable-centric cooking commonly associated with L.A. in favor of something more primal. It is a small butcher shop that sells sandwiches during the day and a larger, cavelike restaurant next door that comes to life in the evening. The restaurant, headed by chef Francis Derby, is named for a celebrated racing cyclist, but the more obvious definition might fit, too: Dinner at the Cannibal will almost certainly involve some type of flesh (though probably not human). Read L.A. Weekly's full review here.