fbpx

The "Alt-Right Isn't Alright" Protest March in Venice Gave Voice to the Anti-Nazi Movement


Credit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted SoquiCredit: Ted Soqui

Hundreds of L.A. area residents attended a diversity march from the Venice Boardwalk to Google headquarters, ending at the HBO offices in Santa Monica. The march was intended to be a counter-protest against a self-described “free speech” rally, organized by Trump supporter Jack Posobiec, which was abruptly canceled after the deadly conflict that occurred during a so-called “alt-right” gathering in Charlottesville, Virginia. The Venice protesters displayed anti-Nazi signs and shouted slogans, while speakers and musicians delivered messages encouraging diversity.