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Old Chinatown Restaurants in Los Angeles


Circa 1939: Tuey Far Low (436 Gin Ling Way) can be seen on the leftCirca 1939: Tuey Far Low (436 Gin Ling Way) can be seen on the left, while shops on the right of this image include Ginling Gifts (441 Gin Ling Way) and the Forbidden Palace (449 Gin Ling Way). The West Gate can be seen in the distance, marking the Castelar (now Hill Street) entrance to New Chinatown.; Credit: Herman Schultheis/Los Angeles Public LibraryCirca 1939: Tuey Far Low (436 Gin Ling Way) can be seen on the leftCirca 1939: Tuey Far Low (436 Gin Ling Way) can be seen on the left, while shops on the right of this image include Ginling Gifts (441 Gin Ling Way) and the Forbidden Palace (449 Gin Ling Way). The West Gate can be seen in the distance, marking the Castelar (now Hill Street) entrance to New Chinatown.; Credit: Herman Schultheis/Los Angeles Public Librarymarking the Castelar (now Hill Street) entrance to New Chinatown.; Credit: Herman Schultheis/Los Angeles Public LibraryCirca 1939: Tuey Far Low (436 Gin Ling Way) can be seen on the left, while shops on the right of this image include Ginling Gifts (441 Gin Ling Way) and the Forbidden Palace (449 Gin Ling Way). The West Gate can be seen in the distance, marking the Castelar (now Hill Street) entrance to New Chinatown.; Credit: Herman Schultheis/Los Angeles Public LibraryCirca 1920: Marchessault Street in Chinatown in Los AngelesCirca 1939: Tuey Far Low (436 Gin Ling Way) can be seen on the left, while shops on the right of this image include Ginling Gifts (441 Gin Ling Way) and the Forbidden Palace (449 Gin Ling Way). The West Gate can be seen in the distance, marking the Castelar (now Hill Street) entrance to New Chinatown.; Credit: Herman Schultheis/Los Angeles Public Libraryand across Marchessault Street is the Chop Suey Cafe.; Credit: Security Pacific National Bank Collection/Los Angeles Public LibraryCirca 1939: Tuey Far Low (436 Gin Ling Way) can be seen on the left, while shops on the right of this image include Ginling Gifts (441 Gin Ling Way) and the Forbidden Palace (449 Gin Ling Way). The West Gate can be seen in the distance, marking the Castelar (now Hill Street) entrance to New Chinatown.; Credit: Herman Schultheis/Los Angeles Public LibraryCirca 1937: Women walk into Soochow Cafe at 504 N. Los Angeles Street in Old Chinatown.; Credit: Herman Schultheis/Los Angeles Public LibraryCirca 1939: Tuey Far Low (436 Gin Ling Way) can be seen on the left, while shops on the right of this image include Ginling Gifts (441 Gin Ling Way) and the Forbidden Palace (449 Gin Ling Way). The West Gate can be seen in the distance, marking the Castelar (now Hill Street) entrance to New Chinatown.; Credit: Herman Schultheis/Los Angeles Public Library1937: Exterior view of Tuey Far Low restaurant in New ChinatownCirca 1939: Tuey Far Low (436 Gin Ling Way) can be seen on the left, while shops on the right of this image include Ginling Gifts (441 Gin Ling Way) and the Forbidden Palace (449 Gin Ling Way). The West Gate can be seen in the distance, marking the Castelar (now Hill Street) entrance to New Chinatown.; Credit: Herman Schultheis/Los Angeles Public Libraryat far left.; Credit: Harry Quillen/Los Angeles Public LibraryCirca 1939: Tuey Far Low (436 Gin Ling Way) can be seen on the left, while shops on the right of this image include Ginling Gifts (441 Gin Ling Way) and the Forbidden Palace (449 Gin Ling Way). The West Gate can be seen in the distance, marking the Castelar (now Hill Street) entrance to New Chinatown.; Credit: Herman Schultheis/Los Angeles Public LibraryCirca 1937: A man stands on the sidewalk in this view down Alameda in Old Chinatown. Mee Fong Cafe at 760 N. Alameda is visible.; Credit: Herman Schultheis/Los Angeles Public LibraryCirca 1939: Tuey Far Low (436 Gin Ling Way) can be seen on the left, while shops on the right of this image include Ginling Gifts (441 Gin Ling Way) and the Forbidden Palace (449 Gin Ling Way). The West Gate can be seen in the distance, marking the Castelar (now Hill Street) entrance to New Chinatown.; Credit: Herman Schultheis/Los Angeles Public LibraryCirca 1937: The neon sign for Joy Yuen Low includes dragons and neon outlining the roof line. Genuine Chinese dishes as well as chop suey are advertised at this restaurant located at 610 N. Spring St.Circa 1939: Tuey Far Low (436 Gin Ling Way) can be seen on the left, while shops on the right of this image include Ginling Gifts (441 Gin Ling Way) and the Forbidden Palace (449 Gin Ling Way). The West Gate can be seen in the distance, marking the Castelar (now Hill Street) entrance to New Chinatown.; Credit: Herman Schultheis/Los Angeles Public LibraryCirca 1937: The neon sign for Joy Yuen Low includes dragons and neon outlining the roof line. Genuine Chinese dishes as well as chop suey are advertised at this restaurant located at 610 N. Spring St.Circa 1939: Tuey Far Low (436 Gin Ling Way) can be seen on the left, while shops on the right of this image include Ginling Gifts (441 Gin Ling Way) and the Forbidden Palace (449 Gin Ling Way). The West Gate can be seen in the distance, marking the Castelar (now Hill Street) entrance to New Chinatown.; Credit: Herman Schultheis/Los Angeles Public Librarydesigned by artist Professor Liu Hong Kay. The caverns are an artistic rendering of a scenic spot in Guangdong provinceCirca 1939: Tuey Far Low (436 Gin Ling Way) can be seen on the left, while shops on the right of this image include Ginling Gifts (441 Gin Ling Way) and the Forbidden Palace (449 Gin Ling Way). The West Gate can be seen in the distance, marking the Castelar (now Hill Street) entrance to New Chinatown.; Credit: Herman Schultheis/Los Angeles Public Librarygift seller Chew Yuen & Co. (459 Gin Ling Way) and herbalist Dun Sow Hong Co. (463 Gin Ling Way).; Credit: Herman Schultheis/Los Angeles Public LibraryCirca 1939: Tuey Far Low (436 Gin Ling Way) can be seen on the left, while shops on the right of this image include Ginling Gifts (441 Gin Ling Way) and the Forbidden Palace (449 Gin Ling Way). The West Gate can be seen in the distance, marking the Castelar (now Hill Street) entrance to New Chinatown.; Credit: Herman Schultheis/Los Angeles Public LibraryCirca 1939: Two boys work at a table in a fortune-teller stand set up next to the Seven Star Sacred Caverns wishing pool in Chinatown and the Mei Ian Food Shoppe (486 Gin Ling Way). The fortune teller's sign reads: "Have your fortune told by the famous fortune teller Charlie Chan." A bare lightbulb has been strung across the roof and hangs above the boys' heads.; Credit: Herman J. Schultheis/Los Angeles Public LibraryCirca 1939: Tuey Far Low (436 Gin Ling Way) can be seen on the left, while shops on the right of this image include Ginling Gifts (441 Gin Ling Way) and the Forbidden Palace (449 Gin Ling Way). The West Gate can be seen in the distance, marking the Castelar (now Hill Street) entrance to New Chinatown.; Credit: Herman Schultheis/Los Angeles Public LibraryCirca 1939: People gather around a photo booth in front of Louie K.G. Chinese Gifts (432 Gin Ling Way). Tuey Far LowCirca 1939: Tuey Far Low (436 Gin Ling Way) can be seen on the left, while shops on the right of this image include Ginling Gifts (441 Gin Ling Way) and the Forbidden Palace (449 Gin Ling Way). The West Gate can be seen in the distance, marking the Castelar (now Hill Street) entrance to New Chinatown.; Credit: Herman Schultheis/Los Angeles Public Libraryfeatures a neon "chop suey" blade sign and a neon cocktail sign.; Credit: Herman Schultheis/Los Angeles Public LibraryCirca 1939: Tuey Far Low (436 Gin Ling Way) can be seen on the left, while shops on the right of this image include Ginling Gifts (441 Gin Ling Way) and the Forbidden Palace (449 Gin Ling Way). The West Gate can be seen in the distance, marking the Castelar (now Hill Street) entrance to New Chinatown.; Credit: Herman Schultheis/Los Angeles Public LibraryCirca 1939: People walk through the West GateCirca 1939: Tuey Far Low (436 Gin Ling Way) can be seen on the left, while shops on the right of this image include Ginling Gifts (441 Gin Ling Way) and the Forbidden Palace (449 Gin Ling Way). The West Gate can be seen in the distance, marking the Castelar (now Hill Street) entrance to New Chinatown.; Credit: Herman Schultheis/Los Angeles Public Librarycomposed by T.K. Chang; the characters translate as "Cooperate to Achieve." Businesses from left to right include Tin Hing Co. jewelers (491 Gin Ling Way)Circa 1939: Tuey Far Low (436 Gin Ling Way) can be seen on the left, while shops on the right of this image include Ginling Gifts (441 Gin Ling Way) and the Forbidden Palace (449 Gin Ling Way). The West Gate can be seen in the distance, marking the Castelar (now Hill Street) entrance to New Chinatown.; Credit: Herman Schultheis/Los Angeles Public Librarymakers of prepared food (487 Gin Ling Way)Circa 1939: Tuey Far Low (436 Gin Ling Way) can be seen on the left, while shops on the right of this image include Ginling Gifts (441 Gin Ling Way) and the Forbidden Palace (449 Gin Ling Way). The West Gate can be seen in the distance, marking the Castelar (now Hill Street) entrance to New Chinatown.; Credit: Herman Schultheis/Los Angeles Public Librarymakers of prepared food (487 Gin Ling Way)Circa 1939: Tuey Far Low (436 Gin Ling Way) can be seen on the left, while shops on the right of this image include Ginling Gifts (441 Gin Ling Way) and the Forbidden Palace (449 Gin Ling Way). The West Gate can be seen in the distance, marking the Castelar (now Hill Street) entrance to New Chinatown.; Credit: Herman Schultheis/Los Angeles Public Libraryerected by Y.C. Hong in honor of his motherCirca 1939: Tuey Far Low (436 Gin Ling Way) can be seen on the left, while shops on the right of this image include Ginling Gifts (441 Gin Ling Way) and the Forbidden Palace (449 Gin Ling Way). The West Gate can be seen in the distance, marking the Castelar (now Hill Street) entrance to New Chinatown.; Credit: Herman Schultheis/Los Angeles Public Libraryand the four Chinese characters across the top of the gate translate as "The spirit of Meng and Ow." Meng and Ow were famous Chinese mothers. A parking lot can be seen on the left and Gin Ling Way is on the right. The Chop Suey sign is for Tuey Far LowCirca 1939: Tuey Far Low (436 Gin Ling Way) can be seen on the left, while shops on the right of this image include Ginling Gifts (441 Gin Ling Way) and the Forbidden Palace (449 Gin Ling Way). The West Gate can be seen in the distance, marking the Castelar (now Hill Street) entrance to New Chinatown.; Credit: Herman Schultheis/Los Angeles Public Libraryand the four Chinese characters across the top of the gate translate as "The spirit of Meng and Ow." Meng and Ow were famous Chinese mothers. A parking lot can be seen on the left and Gin Ling Way is on the right. The Chop Suey sign is for Tuey Far LowCirca 1939: Tuey Far Low (436 Gin Ling Way) can be seen on the left, while shops on the right of this image include Ginling Gifts (441 Gin Ling Way) and the Forbidden Palace (449 Gin Ling Way). The West Gate can be seen in the distance, marking the Castelar (now Hill Street) entrance to New Chinatown.; Credit: Herman Schultheis/Los Angeles Public Librarywhich marks the Broadway entrance to New ChinatownCirca 1939: Tuey Far Low (436 Gin Ling Way) can be seen on the left, while shops on the right of this image include Ginling Gifts (441 Gin Ling Way) and the Forbidden Palace (449 Gin Ling Way). The West Gate can be seen in the distance, marking the Castelar (now Hill Street) entrance to New Chinatown.; Credit: Herman Schultheis/Los Angeles Public Libraryerected by Y.C. Hong in honor of his motherCirca 1939: Tuey Far Low (436 Gin Ling Way) can be seen on the left, while shops on the right of this image include Ginling Gifts (441 Gin Ling Way) and the Forbidden Palace (449 Gin Ling Way). The West Gate can be seen in the distance, marking the Castelar (now Hill Street) entrance to New Chinatown.; Credit: Herman Schultheis/Los Angeles Public Libraryerected by Y.C. Hong in honor of his motherCirca 1939: Tuey Far Low (436 Gin Ling Way) can be seen on the left, while shops on the right of this image include Ginling Gifts (441 Gin Ling Way) and the Forbidden Palace (449 Gin Ling Way). The West Gate can be seen in the distance, marking the Castelar (now Hill Street) entrance to New Chinatown.; Credit: Herman Schultheis/Los Angeles Public Librarydesigned by artist Professor Liu Hong KayCirca 1939: Tuey Far Low (436 Gin Ling Way) can be seen on the left, while shops on the right of this image include Ginling Gifts (441 Gin Ling Way) and the Forbidden Palace (449 Gin Ling Way). The West Gate can be seen in the distance, marking the Castelar (now Hill Street) entrance to New Chinatown.; Credit: Herman Schultheis/Los Angeles Public Libraryas well as Joy Joy Woo restaurant (483 Gin Ling Way)Circa 1939: Tuey Far Low (436 Gin Ling Way) can be seen on the left, while shops on the right of this image include Ginling Gifts (441 Gin Ling Way) and the Forbidden Palace (449 Gin Ling Way). The West Gate can be seen in the distance, marking the Castelar (now Hill Street) entrance to New Chinatown.; Credit: Herman Schultheis/Los Angeles Public Library487 Gin Ling Way)Circa 1939: Tuey Far Low (436 Gin Ling Way) can be seen on the left, while shops on the right of this image include Ginling Gifts (441 Gin Ling Way) and the Forbidden Palace (449 Gin Ling Way). The West Gate can be seen in the distance, marking the Castelar (now Hill Street) entrance to New Chinatown.; Credit: Herman Schultheis/Los Angeles Public Library

We've collected images of Chinatown restaurants from the 1920s to today. It's a fascinating look back at an always-evolving city. And an inspiration to eat, of course. What are your favorite spots in L.A.'s Chinatown? Let us know in comments.