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With California’s gubernatorial recall election days away, Los Angeles polling places have begun opening for early voting.

The L.A. County Registrar announced that 108 polling places will be open daily from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. until September 13, and then 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. on election day Tuesday, September 14.

“Whether you’re returning your mail-in ballot or casting your ballot in the Vote Center, make plans to vote early,” the L.A. County Registrar said.

Mail-in ballots have already been sent out to California voters, which can be mailed by the postmarked day of September 14, or dropped off at one of 400 designated ballot drop-off locations.

Individual ballot statuses can be tracked on LAvote.net after being dropped off or mailed to make sure they were received and tallied.

On the ballot, voters will be asked, “Shall Gavin Newsom be recalled (removed) from the office of governor,” and then choose a successor from a list of 45 candidates.

If the recall goes through, the chosen candidate will serve out the remainder of Gov. Newsom’s term through Jan. 2, 2023.

As of this writing, more than 15,000 ballots have been cast through early voting at the now-open centers, and locations can be found at locator.lavote.net.

With the election drawing closer, Gov. Newsom has gone on the offensive, spending $36 million on campaign efforts – receiving vocal backing from notable Democrat leaders such as U.S. President Joe Biden, Vice President Kamala Harris, and 2020 presidential nominees Bernie Sanders and Amy Klobuchar.

A California poll conducted by Trafalgar Group, from Sept. 2-4, showed that out of a sample size of 1,079 respondents, 53% voted to keep Newsom in office, with 43% voting to remove him and 4% still undecided. The poll consisted of likely ballot casters and had a 2.9% margin of error.

In the same poll, Republican candidate Larry Elder held the lead (32% of the vote) among possible replacements, should Newsom be recalled. Behind him was Democrat Kevin Paffrath with 13% of the vote, although 29% of respondents still remained undecided on a replacement candidate.

LA Weekly