fbpx

In partnership with The Fresh Toast

The CDC has released a statement encouraging people to get creative with their Halloween celebrations and to avoid exposing themselves and others to COVID.

This year we’ll be experiencing our first ever pandemic Halloween. Since people tend to get crazy when October 31 rolls around, the CDC is taking preventative measures, encouraging state governments to implement rulings and guidelines for people to follow.

Los Angeles was one of the first states in the US to put some rules on Halloween, preventing large parties held indoors and outdoors and recommending parents to avoid trick or treating with their kids, which made some people upset.

The CDC has released a statement that explains the basic risks of Halloween during COVID. Experts say that parties and get togethers that involve less people and are held outdoors are considered less risky, even if each situation is different and there’s always a degree of risk when meeting up with members of different households.

RELATED: What Is Quarantine Envy And Do You Have It?

For those who were thinking about replacing their face masks with Halloween masks, the CDC also has bad news: plastic cartoonish masks aren’t effective measures against COVID, unlike boring cloth face masks. Those who are very committed to the spirit of Halloween can double mask, but they might have trouble breathing.

No one is giving your kids marijuana for Halloweeen
Photo by Haley Phelps via Unsplash

The CDC listed out some of the highest risk activities people should avoid this Halloween. First is trick or treating, which people should avoid in all forms, whether they’re going door to door or handing out candy from their cars. The exchange of candy between members of different households makes it likely for germs to spread, even if people are wearing face masks and are distanced.

RELATED: 5 Creepy Podcasts To Listen To Before Halloween

In short, no candy should be exchanged this year. Indoor activities, such as house parties and haunted houses, are also discouraged. Going on tractor or festival rides with members outside of your household is also risky, since this requires proximity to others and there’s higher odds of yelling and spreading particle drops.

The CDC also listed out potential Halloween activities that are safe, including pumpkin carving with household members or friends while complying with social distanced guidelines, using Zoom or Skype to show off your costume, or wearing Halloween themed cloth masks. Because that sounds super fun and not at all depressing.

Read more on The Fresh Toast