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Fans expressed health concerns at Dodgers’ Opening Day as the stadium’s mobile ordering system led to crowded concession stands and a lack of social distancing.

Dodger fans had a chance to attend a live game for the first time in over a year, but multiple fans said they waited in food lines for more than an hour and photos showed crowds bunched together in front of the concessions.

“The food situation is out of control,” Dodger fan Jonathan Garza said in a Twitter post. “…no organization whatsoever.”

Another fan said that employees were having trouble keeping up with the amount of orders and called the mobile ordering system a “total failure.”

As soon as the stadium heard that there were issues with mobile ordering, they removed the feature and announced they would move back to a traditional walk-up ordering system.

“The Dodgers became aware of several issues with mobile ordering at concession stands early in today’s game and quickly disabled the system and switched to traditional walk-up ordering,” The Dodgers said in a statement. “After consultation and cooperation with the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, Dodger Stadium will continue with walk-up ordering, as in past seasons, with social distancing and all health and safety guidelines enforced. Starting tomorrow and moving forward, additional concession locations will be open to better serve Dodger fans. The health and safety of fans remains our top priority.”

(The Dodgers disabled its mobile ordering system after becoming aware of crowding at concessions/Photo by Ernie Villa)

The team then consulted with L.A. Public Health and felt traditional walk-up ordering would be a better option going forward and will be opening additional concession stands.

The World Series Champion Dodgers will continue their series against the Washington Nationals through the weekend with fans continuing to be in attend in person.

The reported attendance for the game was 15,036, as L.A. County currently allows stadiums to seat 25% of its maximum capacity, in accordance with the California Blueprint for a Safer economy.

 

LA Weekly