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In a world of fake cannabis enthusiasm brought and sold by PR firms and influencers, few companies have entered the post-legalization marketplace with the wind in their sales like Blueprint. 

In the process of releasing its first legal drops, the company firmly pulled a chair out for itself at the table when discussing the best cannabis in California – in a loud, drag the chairs across the floor, way.

The first time I smoked Blueprint weed I didn’t even realize it. It was part of one of the numerous pheno hunts they’ve conducted over the last couple of years in search of winning genetics. Every 65 days they have 144 new possibilities.

While we can’t get into the details of what we smoked yet, I was absolutely destroyed. I was fine before the blunt, and then the next thing you know I’m sitting in the Uber with sweat pouring down my face like I got the second vaccination shot again. It was simply spectacular. 

The company was founded by Joe Stanger, Drew Coggio and Jordan Aguilar. The trio has decades of experience in great pot. Aguilar joined us to tell the Blueprint tale. He’s spent nearly a decade in indoor cultivation eventually rising to lead the cultivation efforts at Connected and Alien Labs before moving on to plot his path and Blueprint a couple of years ago.

“You know I’m blessed to see all this happen and be part of it and all the stars have definitely aligned so it’s been pretty amazing,” Aguilar told L.A. Weekly, when asked about the excitement the company is already driving since its recent release across the state at Cookies locations.

Aguilar went on to note how deeply involved he and his partners are in the cultivation process. He said it’s a big key to their success out the gate. 

“We take pride in our work,” Aguilar said. “Me personally, I’ve dedicated the last nine and a half years to growing and looking at everything. All the way down to consumption from seed creation and always breeding, pheno hunting. Obviously veg, flower, dry, cure, trim, smoke and making that whole picture fit.”

Aguilar went exceptionally hard in recent years as he worked to find and create the strains Blueprint is using to introduce itself to the masses, but he plans on keeping the exact genetics that will contribute to the lineup secret. 

Aguilar compared the pheno hunts to find the heat to shooting a free throw on the basketball court with no one around, but now it’s like a basketball game with thousands of fans.

“And on TV and everything. It’s like all sudden you’re shaking, you have that moment where you’re like ‘okay, I can do this same thing doesn’t matter who’s here.’ It was kind of like that,” Aguilar said. 

As for going the nontraditional route on strain names, Blueprint wants to just be original as a brand, and not get into that cat and mouse game. Aguilar argued it puts companies in a position where they have to lie about something, be it having something they’re not supposed to or pretending it’s not on the quest for money.

Blueprint will focus on people knowing they can have faith in what’s in the jar, and while against the grain, they’re certainly not the first to stay hush on their genetics. You know it’s going to be good since they went through 2,000 strains, so far, to find whatever jar you get your hands on. 

Even before the launch, Blueprint already had plans for its next facility. 

“I have six pollination and seed creation chambers. There’s going to be an entire breeding program run off this,” Aguilar told us. “We’re putting in the time and work to do these things and we’ll reveal strain information and kind of grow trait similarities to other things. People are going to try to unravel it with their nose for sure like, ‘oh I know this has this.’ Maybe there’ll be special things where we do reveal some things but that’s going to be kind of our stance as a company.”

Even with his previous success, Aguilar has been caught off guard by the wave of support Blueprint has seen since its inception. He called it the most surprising part of the whole process and gave a big thanks to the community the company plans to be deeply intertwined with.

LA Weekly