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While still in high school in the Bronx, Stanley Kubrick sold his first photograph to picture magazine Look, eventually becoming a staff photographer. Between 1945-50, Kubrick documented not only New York City dwellers, including subway riders, shoe-shine boys, debutantes, boxers, musicians and celebrities, but people and places all over the world. You can see the early genius that launched his iconic movie career at the Skirball’s latest exhibit, Through a Different Lens: Stanley Kubrick Photographs.

Stanley Kubrick. Columbia University . 1948. Museum of the City of New York. The Look Collection. Used with permission of Museum of the City of New York and SK Film Archives

On loan from the Museum of the City of New York, which houses 12,000 of Kubrick’s negatives, more than 130 images are displayed alongside Look issues and organized according to four themes: “Looking,” “Mastering the System,” “Media” and “Visual Style.” The collection also features screenings of the director’s first documentary, Day of the Fight (1951), and an excerpt from his second feature film, Killer’s Kiss (1955), both of which were influenced by his photography.

Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Brentwood; Tue.-Fri., noon-5 p.m.; Sat.-Sun., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Oct. 17-March 8; $12, $9 seniors & students, $7 children, under 2 free. (310) 440-4500, skirball.org.

Stanley Kubrick. Rosemary Williams, Show Girl. 1949. Museum of the City of New York. The Look Collection. Used with permission of Museum of the City of New York and SK Film Archives.