Our Picks for the Best Movies of Fall 2017


Read the full review here.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">The Florida Project: Sean Baker is one of the few filmmakers working today who gets that it's possible to find joy in smallThe Florida Project: Sean Baker is one of the few filmmakers working today who gets that it's possible to find joy in small, difficult corners of the world. His film Tangerine, about two transwomen and their hilarious exploits across Los Angeles, doesn't bow to typical expectations of media featuring transpeople, where their gender identity is always a tragedy and the focus of the story. Sure, Tangerine's characters are poor, and one's fresh out of jail. But the small pleasures of a delicious doughnut can give them the energy to power through any day. With The Florida Project, his follow-up to Tangerine, Baker again grants both humanity and humor to his down-on-their-luck subjects. Little Moonee (Brooklynn Prince) lives with her smack-talking, tatted young mom, Halley (Bria Vinaite), in the Magic Kingdom Motel, walking distance from the throngs that flock to Disney World year-round. Moonee romps around the "neighborhood" (really just a motel-dotted track of interstate) with her little pals, Scooty (Christopher Rivera) and Jancey (Valeria Cotto), getting into trouble wherever they can, while motel manager Bobby (Willem Dafoe) plays the Mr. Wilson to their collective Dennis the Menace. We know that Halley's nights out drinking and her unemployment may not be building toward a happy ending, but this is a story seen through Moonee's eyes. She believes that as long as you're clever and cute enough, you can scheme your way out of anything.
Read the full review here.; Credit: Courtesy of A24
Read the full review here.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">The Florida Project: Sean Baker is one of the few filmmakers working today who gets that it's possible to find joy in smallThe Florida Project: Sean Baker is one of the few filmmakers working today who gets that it's possible to find joy in small, difficult corners of the world. His film Tangerine, about two transwomen and their hilarious exploits across Los Angeles, doesn't bow to typical expectations of media featuring transpeople, where their gender identity is always a tragedy and the focus of the story. Sure, Tangerine's characters are poor, and one's fresh out of jail. But the small pleasures of a delicious doughnut can give them the energy to power through any day. With The Florida Project, his follow-up to Tangerine, Baker again grants both humanity and humor to his down-on-their-luck subjects. Little Moonee (Brooklynn Prince) lives with her smack-talking, tatted young mom, Halley (Bria Vinaite), in the Magic Kingdom Motel, walking distance from the throngs that flock to Disney World year-round. Moonee romps around the "neighborhood" (really just a motel-dotted track of interstate) with her little pals, Scooty (Christopher Rivera) and Jancey (Valeria Cotto), getting into trouble wherever they can, while motel manager Bobby (Willem Dafoe) plays the Mr. Wilson to their collective Dennis the Menace. We know that Halley's nights out drinking and her unemployment may not be building toward a happy ending, but this is a story seen through Moonee's eyes. She believes that as long as you're clever and cute enough, you can scheme your way out of anything.
Read the full review here.; Credit: Courtesy of A24
Read the full review here.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">about two transwomen and their hilarious exploits across Los AngelesThe Florida Project: Sean Baker is one of the few filmmakers working today who gets that it's possible to find joy in small, difficult corners of the world. His film Tangerine, about two transwomen and their hilarious exploits across Los Angeles, doesn't bow to typical expectations of media featuring transpeople, where their gender identity is always a tragedy and the focus of the story. Sure, Tangerine's characters are poor, and one's fresh out of jail. But the small pleasures of a delicious doughnut can give them the energy to power through any day. With The Florida Project, his follow-up to Tangerine, Baker again grants both humanity and humor to his down-on-their-luck subjects. Little Moonee (Brooklynn Prince) lives with her smack-talking, tatted young mom, Halley (Bria Vinaite), in the Magic Kingdom Motel, walking distance from the throngs that flock to Disney World year-round. Moonee romps around the "neighborhood" (really just a motel-dotted track of interstate) with her little pals, Scooty (Christopher Rivera) and Jancey (Valeria Cotto), getting into trouble wherever they can, while motel manager Bobby (Willem Dafoe) plays the Mr. Wilson to their collective Dennis the Menace. We know that Halley's nights out drinking and her unemployment may not be building toward a happy ending, but this is a story seen through Moonee's eyes. She believes that as long as you're clever and cute enough, you can scheme your way out of anything.
Read the full review here.; Credit: Courtesy of A24
Read the full review here.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">where their gender identity is always a tragedy and the focus of the story. SureThe Florida Project: Sean Baker is one of the few filmmakers working today who gets that it's possible to find joy in small, difficult corners of the world. His film Tangerine, about two transwomen and their hilarious exploits across Los Angeles, doesn't bow to typical expectations of media featuring transpeople, where their gender identity is always a tragedy and the focus of the story. Sure, Tangerine's characters are poor, and one's fresh out of jail. But the small pleasures of a delicious doughnut can give them the energy to power through any day. With The Florida Project, his follow-up to Tangerine, Baker again grants both humanity and humor to his down-on-their-luck subjects. Little Moonee (Brooklynn Prince) lives with her smack-talking, tatted young mom, Halley (Bria Vinaite), in the Magic Kingdom Motel, walking distance from the throngs that flock to Disney World year-round. Moonee romps around the "neighborhood" (really just a motel-dotted track of interstate) with her little pals, Scooty (Christopher Rivera) and Jancey (Valeria Cotto), getting into trouble wherever they can, while motel manager Bobby (Willem Dafoe) plays the Mr. Wilson to their collective Dennis the Menace. We know that Halley's nights out drinking and her unemployment may not be building toward a happy ending, but this is a story seen through Moonee's eyes. She believes that as long as you're clever and cute enough, you can scheme your way out of anything.
Read the full review here.; Credit: Courtesy of A24
Read the full review here.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">and one's fresh out of jail. But the small pleasures of a delicious doughnut can give them the energy to power through any day. With The Florida ProjectThe Florida Project: Sean Baker is one of the few filmmakers working today who gets that it's possible to find joy in small, difficult corners of the world. His film Tangerine, about two transwomen and their hilarious exploits across Los Angeles, doesn't bow to typical expectations of media featuring transpeople, where their gender identity is always a tragedy and the focus of the story. Sure, Tangerine's characters are poor, and one's fresh out of jail. But the small pleasures of a delicious doughnut can give them the energy to power through any day. With The Florida Project, his follow-up to Tangerine, Baker again grants both humanity and humor to his down-on-their-luck subjects. Little Moonee (Brooklynn Prince) lives with her smack-talking, tatted young mom, Halley (Bria Vinaite), in the Magic Kingdom Motel, walking distance from the throngs that flock to Disney World year-round. Moonee romps around the "neighborhood" (really just a motel-dotted track of interstate) with her little pals, Scooty (Christopher Rivera) and Jancey (Valeria Cotto), getting into trouble wherever they can, while motel manager Bobby (Willem Dafoe) plays the Mr. Wilson to their collective Dennis the Menace. We know that Halley's nights out drinking and her unemployment may not be building toward a happy ending, but this is a story seen through Moonee's eyes. She believes that as long as you're clever and cute enough, you can scheme your way out of anything.
Read the full review here.; Credit: Courtesy of A24
Read the full review here.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">Baker again grants both humanity and humor to his down-on-their-luck subjects. Little Moonee (Brooklynn Prince) lives with her smack-talkingThe Florida Project: Sean Baker is one of the few filmmakers working today who gets that it's possible to find joy in small, difficult corners of the world. His film Tangerine, about two transwomen and their hilarious exploits across Los Angeles, doesn't bow to typical expectations of media featuring transpeople, where their gender identity is always a tragedy and the focus of the story. Sure, Tangerine's characters are poor, and one's fresh out of jail. But the small pleasures of a delicious doughnut can give them the energy to power through any day. With The Florida Project, his follow-up to Tangerine, Baker again grants both humanity and humor to his down-on-their-luck subjects. Little Moonee (Brooklynn Prince) lives with her smack-talking, tatted young mom, Halley (Bria Vinaite), in the Magic Kingdom Motel, walking distance from the throngs that flock to Disney World year-round. Moonee romps around the "neighborhood" (really just a motel-dotted track of interstate) with her little pals, Scooty (Christopher Rivera) and Jancey (Valeria Cotto), getting into trouble wherever they can, while motel manager Bobby (Willem Dafoe) plays the Mr. Wilson to their collective Dennis the Menace. We know that Halley's nights out drinking and her unemployment may not be building toward a happy ending, but this is a story seen through Moonee's eyes. She believes that as long as you're clever and cute enough, you can scheme your way out of anything.
Read the full review here.; Credit: Courtesy of A24
Read the full review here.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">Halley (Bria Vinaite)The Florida Project: Sean Baker is one of the few filmmakers working today who gets that it's possible to find joy in small, difficult corners of the world. His film Tangerine, about two transwomen and their hilarious exploits across Los Angeles, doesn't bow to typical expectations of media featuring transpeople, where their gender identity is always a tragedy and the focus of the story. Sure, Tangerine's characters are poor, and one's fresh out of jail. But the small pleasures of a delicious doughnut can give them the energy to power through any day. With The Florida Project, his follow-up to Tangerine, Baker again grants both humanity and humor to his down-on-their-luck subjects. Little Moonee (Brooklynn Prince) lives with her smack-talking, tatted young mom, Halley (Bria Vinaite), in the Magic Kingdom Motel, walking distance from the throngs that flock to Disney World year-round. Moonee romps around the "neighborhood" (really just a motel-dotted track of interstate) with her little pals, Scooty (Christopher Rivera) and Jancey (Valeria Cotto), getting into trouble wherever they can, while motel manager Bobby (Willem Dafoe) plays the Mr. Wilson to their collective Dennis the Menace. We know that Halley's nights out drinking and her unemployment may not be building toward a happy ending, but this is a story seen through Moonee's eyes. She believes that as long as you're clever and cute enough, you can scheme your way out of anything.
Read the full review here.; Credit: Courtesy of A24
Read the full review here.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">walking distance from the throngs that flock to Disney World year-round. Moonee romps around the "neighborhood" (really just a motel-dotted track of interstate) with her little palsThe Florida Project: Sean Baker is one of the few filmmakers working today who gets that it's possible to find joy in small, difficult corners of the world. His film Tangerine, about two transwomen and their hilarious exploits across Los Angeles, doesn't bow to typical expectations of media featuring transpeople, where their gender identity is always a tragedy and the focus of the story. Sure, Tangerine's characters are poor, and one's fresh out of jail. But the small pleasures of a delicious doughnut can give them the energy to power through any day. With The Florida Project, his follow-up to Tangerine, Baker again grants both humanity and humor to his down-on-their-luck subjects. Little Moonee (Brooklynn Prince) lives with her smack-talking, tatted young mom, Halley (Bria Vinaite), in the Magic Kingdom Motel, walking distance from the throngs that flock to Disney World year-round. Moonee romps around the "neighborhood" (really just a motel-dotted track of interstate) with her little pals, Scooty (Christopher Rivera) and Jancey (Valeria Cotto), getting into trouble wherever they can, while motel manager Bobby (Willem Dafoe) plays the Mr. Wilson to their collective Dennis the Menace. We know that Halley's nights out drinking and her unemployment may not be building toward a happy ending, but this is a story seen through Moonee's eyes. She believes that as long as you're clever and cute enough, you can scheme your way out of anything.
Read the full review here.; Credit: Courtesy of A24
Read the full review here.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">getting into trouble wherever they canThe Florida Project: Sean Baker is one of the few filmmakers working today who gets that it's possible to find joy in small, difficult corners of the world. His film Tangerine, about two transwomen and their hilarious exploits across Los Angeles, doesn't bow to typical expectations of media featuring transpeople, where their gender identity is always a tragedy and the focus of the story. Sure, Tangerine's characters are poor, and one's fresh out of jail. But the small pleasures of a delicious doughnut can give them the energy to power through any day. With The Florida Project, his follow-up to Tangerine, Baker again grants both humanity and humor to his down-on-their-luck subjects. Little Moonee (Brooklynn Prince) lives with her smack-talking, tatted young mom, Halley (Bria Vinaite), in the Magic Kingdom Motel, walking distance from the throngs that flock to Disney World year-round. Moonee romps around the "neighborhood" (really just a motel-dotted track of interstate) with her little pals, Scooty (Christopher Rivera) and Jancey (Valeria Cotto), getting into trouble wherever they can, while motel manager Bobby (Willem Dafoe) plays the Mr. Wilson to their collective Dennis the Menace. We know that Halley's nights out drinking and her unemployment may not be building toward a happy ending, but this is a story seen through Moonee's eyes. She believes that as long as you're clever and cute enough, you can scheme your way out of anything.
Read the full review here.; Credit: Courtesy of A24
Read the full review here.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">but this is a story seen through Moonee's eyes. She believes that as long as you're clever and cute enoughThe Florida Project: Sean Baker is one of the few filmmakers working today who gets that it's possible to find joy in small, difficult corners of the world. His film Tangerine, about two transwomen and their hilarious exploits across Los Angeles, doesn't bow to typical expectations of media featuring transpeople, where their gender identity is always a tragedy and the focus of the story. Sure, Tangerine's characters are poor, and one's fresh out of jail. But the small pleasures of a delicious doughnut can give them the energy to power through any day. With The Florida Project, his follow-up to Tangerine, Baker again grants both humanity and humor to his down-on-their-luck subjects. Little Moonee (Brooklynn Prince) lives with her smack-talking, tatted young mom, Halley (Bria Vinaite), in the Magic Kingdom Motel, walking distance from the throngs that flock to Disney World year-round. Moonee romps around the "neighborhood" (really just a motel-dotted track of interstate) with her little pals, Scooty (Christopher Rivera) and Jancey (Valeria Cotto), getting into trouble wherever they can, while motel manager Bobby (Willem Dafoe) plays the Mr. Wilson to their collective Dennis the Menace. We know that Halley's nights out drinking and her unemployment may not be building toward a happy ending, but this is a story seen through Moonee's eyes. She believes that as long as you're clever and cute enough, you can scheme your way out of anything.
Read the full review here.; Credit: Courtesy of A24
Read the full review here.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">but this is a story seen through Moonee's eyes. She believes that as long as you're clever and cute enoughThe Florida Project: Sean Baker is one of the few filmmakers working today who gets that it's possible to find joy in small, difficult corners of the world. His film Tangerine, about two transwomen and their hilarious exploits across Los Angeles, doesn't bow to typical expectations of media featuring transpeople, where their gender identity is always a tragedy and the focus of the story. Sure, Tangerine's characters are poor, and one's fresh out of jail. But the small pleasures of a delicious doughnut can give them the energy to power through any day. With The Florida Project, his follow-up to Tangerine, Baker again grants both humanity and humor to his down-on-their-luck subjects. Little Moonee (Brooklynn Prince) lives with her smack-talking, tatted young mom, Halley (Bria Vinaite), in the Magic Kingdom Motel, walking distance from the throngs that flock to Disney World year-round. Moonee romps around the "neighborhood" (really just a motel-dotted track of interstate) with her little pals, Scooty (Christopher Rivera) and Jancey (Valeria Cotto), getting into trouble wherever they can, while motel manager Bobby (Willem Dafoe) plays the Mr. Wilson to their collective Dennis the Menace. We know that Halley's nights out drinking and her unemployment may not be building toward a happy ending, but this is a story seen through Moonee's eyes. She believes that as long as you're clever and cute enough, you can scheme your way out of anything.
Read the full review here.; Credit: Courtesy of A24
Read the full review here.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">he weaponizes it with humiliating ruthlessness. NowThe Florida Project: Sean Baker is one of the few filmmakers working today who gets that it's possible to find joy in small, difficult corners of the world. His film Tangerine, about two transwomen and their hilarious exploits across Los Angeles, doesn't bow to typical expectations of media featuring transpeople, where their gender identity is always a tragedy and the focus of the story. Sure, Tangerine's characters are poor, and one's fresh out of jail. But the small pleasures of a delicious doughnut can give them the energy to power through any day. With The Florida Project, his follow-up to Tangerine, Baker again grants both humanity and humor to his down-on-their-luck subjects. Little Moonee (Brooklynn Prince) lives with her smack-talking, tatted young mom, Halley (Bria Vinaite), in the Magic Kingdom Motel, walking distance from the throngs that flock to Disney World year-round. Moonee romps around the "neighborhood" (really just a motel-dotted track of interstate) with her little pals, Scooty (Christopher Rivera) and Jancey (Valeria Cotto), getting into trouble wherever they can, while motel manager Bobby (Willem Dafoe) plays the Mr. Wilson to their collective Dennis the Menace. We know that Halley's nights out drinking and her unemployment may not be building toward a happy ending, but this is a story seen through Moonee's eyes. She believes that as long as you're clever and cute enough, you can scheme your way out of anything.
Read the full review here.; Credit: Courtesy of A24
Read the full review here.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">and it feels like something momentous and new for the actor. Whereas Paul Thomas Anderson's Punch-Drunk Love used Sandler's existing persona brilliantly to create an extreme and beautifully self-aware version of an Adam Sandler MovieThe Florida Project: Sean Baker is one of the few filmmakers working today who gets that it's possible to find joy in small, difficult corners of the world. His film Tangerine, about two transwomen and their hilarious exploits across Los Angeles, doesn't bow to typical expectations of media featuring transpeople, where their gender identity is always a tragedy and the focus of the story. Sure, Tangerine's characters are poor, and one's fresh out of jail. But the small pleasures of a delicious doughnut can give them the energy to power through any day. With The Florida Project, his follow-up to Tangerine, Baker again grants both humanity and humor to his down-on-their-luck subjects. Little Moonee (Brooklynn Prince) lives with her smack-talking, tatted young mom, Halley (Bria Vinaite), in the Magic Kingdom Motel, walking distance from the throngs that flock to Disney World year-round. Moonee romps around the "neighborhood" (really just a motel-dotted track of interstate) with her little pals, Scooty (Christopher Rivera) and Jancey (Valeria Cotto), getting into trouble wherever they can, while motel manager Bobby (Willem Dafoe) plays the Mr. Wilson to their collective Dennis the Menace. We know that Halley's nights out drinking and her unemployment may not be building toward a happy ending, but this is a story seen through Moonee's eyes. She believes that as long as you're clever and cute enough, you can scheme your way out of anything.
Read the full review here.; Credit: Courtesy of A24
Read the full review here.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">Meyerowitzis a self-consciously ambling comedy exploring the relationship between two very different brothers and their oddball father. Sandler is the unemployedThe Florida Project: Sean Baker is one of the few filmmakers working today who gets that it's possible to find joy in small, difficult corners of the world. His film Tangerine, about two transwomen and their hilarious exploits across Los Angeles, doesn't bow to typical expectations of media featuring transpeople, where their gender identity is always a tragedy and the focus of the story. Sure, Tangerine's characters are poor, and one's fresh out of jail. But the small pleasures of a delicious doughnut can give them the energy to power through any day. With The Florida Project, his follow-up to Tangerine, Baker again grants both humanity and humor to his down-on-their-luck subjects. Little Moonee (Brooklynn Prince) lives with her smack-talking, tatted young mom, Halley (Bria Vinaite), in the Magic Kingdom Motel, walking distance from the throngs that flock to Disney World year-round. Moonee romps around the "neighborhood" (really just a motel-dotted track of interstate) with her little pals, Scooty (Christopher Rivera) and Jancey (Valeria Cotto), getting into trouble wherever they can, while motel manager Bobby (Willem Dafoe) plays the Mr. Wilson to their collective Dennis the Menace. We know that Halley's nights out drinking and her unemployment may not be building toward a happy ending, but this is a story seen through Moonee's eyes. She believes that as long as you're clever and cute enough, you can scheme your way out of anything.
Read the full review here.; Credit: Courtesy of A24
Read the full review here.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">Ben Stiller the high-powered accountant to the stars and Dustin Hoffman their failed-artist father. So we've got Sandler plus Stiller plus HoffmanThe Florida Project: Sean Baker is one of the few filmmakers working today who gets that it's possible to find joy in small, difficult corners of the world. His film Tangerine, about two transwomen and their hilarious exploits across Los Angeles, doesn't bow to typical expectations of media featuring transpeople, where their gender identity is always a tragedy and the focus of the story. Sure, Tangerine's characters are poor, and one's fresh out of jail. But the small pleasures of a delicious doughnut can give them the energy to power through any day. With The Florida Project, his follow-up to Tangerine, Baker again grants both humanity and humor to his down-on-their-luck subjects. Little Moonee (Brooklynn Prince) lives with her smack-talking, tatted young mom, Halley (Bria Vinaite), in the Magic Kingdom Motel, walking distance from the throngs that flock to Disney World year-round. Moonee romps around the "neighborhood" (really just a motel-dotted track of interstate) with her little pals, Scooty (Christopher Rivera) and Jancey (Valeria Cotto), getting into trouble wherever they can, while motel manager Bobby (Willem Dafoe) plays the Mr. Wilson to their collective Dennis the Menace. We know that Halley's nights out drinking and her unemployment may not be building toward a happy ending, but this is a story seen through Moonee's eyes. She believes that as long as you're clever and cute enough, you can scheme your way out of anything.
Read the full review here.; Credit: Courtesy of A24
Read the full review here.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">a neurotic who has amounted to very little in this world. As Danny tries to raise his precociousThe Florida Project: Sean Baker is one of the few filmmakers working today who gets that it's possible to find joy in small, difficult corners of the world. His film Tangerine, about two transwomen and their hilarious exploits across Los Angeles, doesn't bow to typical expectations of media featuring transpeople, where their gender identity is always a tragedy and the focus of the story. Sure, Tangerine's characters are poor, and one's fresh out of jail. But the small pleasures of a delicious doughnut can give them the energy to power through any day. With The Florida Project, his follow-up to Tangerine, Baker again grants both humanity and humor to his down-on-their-luck subjects. Little Moonee (Brooklynn Prince) lives with her smack-talking, tatted young mom, Halley (Bria Vinaite), in the Magic Kingdom Motel, walking distance from the throngs that flock to Disney World year-round. Moonee romps around the "neighborhood" (really just a motel-dotted track of interstate) with her little pals, Scooty (Christopher Rivera) and Jancey (Valeria Cotto), getting into trouble wherever they can, while motel manager Bobby (Willem Dafoe) plays the Mr. Wilson to their collective Dennis the Menace. We know that Halley's nights out drinking and her unemployment may not be building toward a happy ending, but this is a story seen through Moonee's eyes. She believes that as long as you're clever and cute enough, you can scheme your way out of anything.
Read the full review here.; Credit: Courtesy of A24
Read the full review here.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">old-school–New York art-elite dadThe Florida Project: Sean Baker is one of the few filmmakers working today who gets that it's possible to find joy in small, difficult corners of the world. His film Tangerine, about two transwomen and their hilarious exploits across Los Angeles, doesn't bow to typical expectations of media featuring transpeople, where their gender identity is always a tragedy and the focus of the story. Sure, Tangerine's characters are poor, and one's fresh out of jail. But the small pleasures of a delicious doughnut can give them the energy to power through any day. With The Florida Project, his follow-up to Tangerine, Baker again grants both humanity and humor to his down-on-their-luck subjects. Little Moonee (Brooklynn Prince) lives with her smack-talking, tatted young mom, Halley (Bria Vinaite), in the Magic Kingdom Motel, walking distance from the throngs that flock to Disney World year-round. Moonee romps around the "neighborhood" (really just a motel-dotted track of interstate) with her little pals, Scooty (Christopher Rivera) and Jancey (Valeria Cotto), getting into trouble wherever they can, while motel manager Bobby (Willem Dafoe) plays the Mr. Wilson to their collective Dennis the Menace. We know that Halley's nights out drinking and her unemployment may not be building toward a happy ending, but this is a story seen through Moonee's eyes. She believes that as long as you're clever and cute enough, you can scheme your way out of anything.
Read the full review here.; Credit: Courtesy of A24

Watching movies for a living is a tough job, but somebody's got to do it, and our film critics are up to the task. While they see plenty of stellar movies, they see some not-so-great ones, too. They've weeded through them all to give you their picks for some of the best films released this fall. If a few haven’t opened in a theater near you just yet, don’t fret: There’s always a chance you’ll be able to stream them on your small screen, or they may go into wider release before the end of 2017.