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Our Critics’ Picks for Movies to See ASAP


For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">Moonlight: A question is posed to the main character of Barry Jenkins’ wondrousMoonlight: A question is posed to the main character of Barry Jenkins’ wondrous, superbly acted new film, Moonlight: “Who is you, man?” The beauty of Jenkins’ second feature, which follows his San Francisco–set black-boho romance Medicine for Melancholy (2008), radiates from the way that query is explored and answered: with specifics and expansiveness, not with foregone conclusions. It is asked by a black man of another black man — those to whom so much poisonous meaning and deranged mythology have long been ascribed, those too often not deemed worthy to be given a chance to respond to this most fundamental of inquiries. —Melissa Anderson

For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24
For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">Moonlight: A question is posed to the main character of Barry Jenkins’ wondrousMoonlight: A question is posed to the main character of Barry Jenkins’ wondrous, superbly acted new film, Moonlight: “Who is you, man?” The beauty of Jenkins’ second feature, which follows his San Francisco–set black-boho romance Medicine for Melancholy (2008), radiates from the way that query is explored and answered: with specifics and expansiveness, not with foregone conclusions. It is asked by a black man of another black man — those to whom so much poisonous meaning and deranged mythology have long been ascribed, those too often not deemed worthy to be given a chance to respond to this most fundamental of inquiries. —Melissa Anderson

For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24
For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">Moonlight: “Who is youMoonlight: A question is posed to the main character of Barry Jenkins’ wondrous, superbly acted new film, Moonlight: “Who is you, man?” The beauty of Jenkins’ second feature, which follows his San Francisco–set black-boho romance Medicine for Melancholy (2008), radiates from the way that query is explored and answered: with specifics and expansiveness, not with foregone conclusions. It is asked by a black man of another black man — those to whom so much poisonous meaning and deranged mythology have long been ascribed, those too often not deemed worthy to be given a chance to respond to this most fundamental of inquiries. —Melissa Anderson

For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24
For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">which follows his San Francisco–set black-boho romance Medicine for Melancholy (2008)Moonlight: A question is posed to the main character of Barry Jenkins’ wondrous, superbly acted new film, Moonlight: “Who is you, man?” The beauty of Jenkins’ second feature, which follows his San Francisco–set black-boho romance Medicine for Melancholy (2008), radiates from the way that query is explored and answered: with specifics and expansiveness, not with foregone conclusions. It is asked by a black man of another black man — those to whom so much poisonous meaning and deranged mythology have long been ascribed, those too often not deemed worthy to be given a chance to respond to this most fundamental of inquiries. —Melissa Anderson

For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24
For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">not with foregone conclusions. It is asked by a black man of another black man — those to whom so much poisonous meaning and deranged mythology have long been ascribedMoonlight: A question is posed to the main character of Barry Jenkins’ wondrous, superbly acted new film, Moonlight: “Who is you, man?” The beauty of Jenkins’ second feature, which follows his San Francisco–set black-boho romance Medicine for Melancholy (2008), radiates from the way that query is explored and answered: with specifics and expansiveness, not with foregone conclusions. It is asked by a black man of another black man — those to whom so much poisonous meaning and deranged mythology have long been ascribed, those too often not deemed worthy to be given a chance to respond to this most fundamental of inquiries. —Melissa Anderson

For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24
For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">not with foregone conclusions. It is asked by a black man of another black man — those to whom so much poisonous meaning and deranged mythology have long been ascribedMoonlight: A question is posed to the main character of Barry Jenkins’ wondrous, superbly acted new film, Moonlight: “Who is you, man?” The beauty of Jenkins’ second feature, which follows his San Francisco–set black-boho romance Medicine for Melancholy (2008), radiates from the way that query is explored and answered: with specifics and expansiveness, not with foregone conclusions. It is asked by a black man of another black man — those to whom so much poisonous meaning and deranged mythology have long been ascribed, those too often not deemed worthy to be given a chance to respond to this most fundamental of inquiries. —Melissa Anderson

For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24
For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24Moonlight: A question is posed to the main character of Barry Jenkins’ wondrous, superbly acted new film, Moonlight: “Who is you, man?” The beauty of Jenkins’ second feature, which follows his San Francisco–set black-boho romance Medicine for Melancholy (2008), radiates from the way that query is explored and answered: with specifics and expansiveness, not with foregone conclusions. It is asked by a black man of another black man — those to whom so much poisonous meaning and deranged mythology have long been ascribed, those too often not deemed worthy to be given a chance to respond to this most fundamental of inquiries. —Melissa Anderson

For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24
For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">The Handmaiden: When Sarah Waters published her gothic lesbian suspense novel Fingersmith in early 2002Moonlight: A question is posed to the main character of Barry Jenkins’ wondrous, superbly acted new film, Moonlight: “Who is you, man?” The beauty of Jenkins’ second feature, which follows his San Francisco–set black-boho romance Medicine for Melancholy (2008), radiates from the way that query is explored and answered: with specifics and expansiveness, not with foregone conclusions. It is asked by a black man of another black man — those to whom so much poisonous meaning and deranged mythology have long been ascribed, those too often not deemed worthy to be given a chance to respond to this most fundamental of inquiries. —Melissa Anderson

For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24
For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">building to today’s legalized same-sex marriage and a presidential candidate’s full-throated support for expanded LGBT rights. Buoyed by that shiftMoonlight: A question is posed to the main character of Barry Jenkins’ wondrous, superbly acted new film, Moonlight: “Who is you, man?” The beauty of Jenkins’ second feature, which follows his San Francisco–set black-boho romance Medicine for Melancholy (2008), radiates from the way that query is explored and answered: with specifics and expansiveness, not with foregone conclusions. It is asked by a black man of another black man — those to whom so much poisonous meaning and deranged mythology have long been ascribed, those too often not deemed worthy to be given a chance to respond to this most fundamental of inquiries. —Melissa Anderson

For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24
For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">but Waters — who’d written an entire dissertation on the lack of LGBT sex in fiction — was making a pointMoonlight: A question is posed to the main character of Barry Jenkins’ wondrous, superbly acted new film, Moonlight: “Who is you, man?” The beauty of Jenkins’ second feature, which follows his San Francisco–set black-boho romance Medicine for Melancholy (2008), radiates from the way that query is explored and answered: with specifics and expansiveness, not with foregone conclusions. It is asked by a black man of another black man — those to whom so much poisonous meaning and deranged mythology have long been ascribed, those too often not deemed worthy to be given a chance to respond to this most fundamental of inquiries. —Melissa Anderson

For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24
For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">I balked: What can a man add to this story? —April Wolfe

Moonlight: A question is posed to the main character of Barry Jenkins’ wondrous, superbly acted new film, Moonlight: “Who is you, man?” The beauty of Jenkins’ second feature, which follows his San Francisco–set black-boho romance Medicine for Melancholy (2008), radiates from the way that query is explored and answered: with specifics and expansiveness, not with foregone conclusions. It is asked by a black man of another black man — those to whom so much poisonous meaning and deranged mythology have long been ascribed, those too often not deemed worthy to be given a chance to respond to this most fundamental of inquiries. —Melissa Anderson

For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24
For more" data-rightCaption="Moonlight: A question is posed to the main character of Barry Jenkins’ wondrous, superbly acted new film, Moonlight: “Who is you, man?” The beauty of Jenkins’ second feature, which follows his San Francisco–set black-boho romance Medicine for Melancholy (2008), radiates from the way that query is explored and answered: with specifics and expansiveness, not with foregone conclusions. It is asked by a black man of another black man — those to whom so much poisonous meaning and deranged mythology have long been ascribed, those too often not deemed worthy to be given a chance to respond to this most fundamental of inquiries. —Melissa Anderson

For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">For moreMoonlight: A question is posed to the main character of Barry Jenkins’ wondrous, superbly acted new film, Moonlight: “Who is you, man?” The beauty of Jenkins’ second feature, which follows his San Francisco–set black-boho romance Medicine for Melancholy (2008), radiates from the way that query is explored and answered: with specifics and expansiveness, not with foregone conclusions. It is asked by a black man of another black man — those to whom so much poisonous meaning and deranged mythology have long been ascribed, those too often not deemed worthy to be given a chance to respond to this most fundamental of inquiries. —Melissa Anderson

For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24
For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">For moreMoonlight: A question is posed to the main character of Barry Jenkins’ wondrous, superbly acted new film, Moonlight: “Who is you, man?” The beauty of Jenkins’ second feature, which follows his San Francisco–set black-boho romance Medicine for Melancholy (2008), radiates from the way that query is explored and answered: with specifics and expansiveness, not with foregone conclusions. It is asked by a black man of another black man — those to whom so much poisonous meaning and deranged mythology have long been ascribed, those too often not deemed worthy to be given a chance to respond to this most fundamental of inquiries. —Melissa Anderson

For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24
For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">not after 13thMoonlight: A question is posed to the main character of Barry Jenkins’ wondrous, superbly acted new film, Moonlight: “Who is you, man?” The beauty of Jenkins’ second feature, which follows his San Francisco–set black-boho romance Medicine for Melancholy (2008), radiates from the way that query is explored and answered: with specifics and expansiveness, not with foregone conclusions. It is asked by a black man of another black man — those to whom so much poisonous meaning and deranged mythology have long been ascribed, those too often not deemed worthy to be given a chance to respond to this most fundamental of inquiries. —Melissa Anderson

For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24
For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">even though nothing in it should be a surprise. —Alan Scherstuhl

Moonlight: A question is posed to the main character of Barry Jenkins’ wondrous, superbly acted new film, Moonlight: “Who is you, man?” The beauty of Jenkins’ second feature, which follows his San Francisco–set black-boho romance Medicine for Melancholy (2008), radiates from the way that query is explored and answered: with specifics and expansiveness, not with foregone conclusions. It is asked by a black man of another black man — those to whom so much poisonous meaning and deranged mythology have long been ascribed, those too often not deemed worthy to be given a chance to respond to this most fundamental of inquiries. —Melissa Anderson

For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24
For more" data-rightCaption="Moonlight: A question is posed to the main character of Barry Jenkins’ wondrous, superbly acted new film, Moonlight: “Who is you, man?” The beauty of Jenkins’ second feature, which follows his San Francisco–set black-boho romance Medicine for Melancholy (2008), radiates from the way that query is explored and answered: with specifics and expansiveness, not with foregone conclusions. It is asked by a black man of another black man — those to whom so much poisonous meaning and deranged mythology have long been ascribed, those too often not deemed worthy to be given a chance to respond to this most fundamental of inquiries. —Melissa Anderson

For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">For moreMoonlight: A question is posed to the main character of Barry Jenkins’ wondrous, superbly acted new film, Moonlight: “Who is you, man?” The beauty of Jenkins’ second feature, which follows his San Francisco–set black-boho romance Medicine for Melancholy (2008), radiates from the way that query is explored and answered: with specifics and expansiveness, not with foregone conclusions. It is asked by a black man of another black man — those to whom so much poisonous meaning and deranged mythology have long been ascribed, those too often not deemed worthy to be given a chance to respond to this most fundamental of inquiries. —Melissa Anderson

For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24
For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">For moreMoonlight: A question is posed to the main character of Barry Jenkins’ wondrous, superbly acted new film, Moonlight: “Who is you, man?” The beauty of Jenkins’ second feature, which follows his San Francisco–set black-boho romance Medicine for Melancholy (2008), radiates from the way that query is explored and answered: with specifics and expansiveness, not with foregone conclusions. It is asked by a black man of another black man — those to whom so much poisonous meaning and deranged mythology have long been ascribed, those too often not deemed worthy to be given a chance to respond to this most fundamental of inquiries. —Melissa Anderson

For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24
For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">as it must in a film about the turbulent relationship between two adolescent boys. But here the psychic disorder advances the story rather than derails it. —Melissa Anderson

Moonlight: A question is posed to the main character of Barry Jenkins’ wondrous, superbly acted new film, Moonlight: “Who is you, man?” The beauty of Jenkins’ second feature, which follows his San Francisco–set black-boho romance Medicine for Melancholy (2008), radiates from the way that query is explored and answered: with specifics and expansiveness, not with foregone conclusions. It is asked by a black man of another black man — those to whom so much poisonous meaning and deranged mythology have long been ascribed, those too often not deemed worthy to be given a chance to respond to this most fundamental of inquiries. —Melissa Anderson

For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24
For more" data-rightCaption="Moonlight: A question is posed to the main character of Barry Jenkins’ wondrous, superbly acted new film, Moonlight: “Who is you, man?” The beauty of Jenkins’ second feature, which follows his San Francisco–set black-boho romance Medicine for Melancholy (2008), radiates from the way that query is explored and answered: with specifics and expansiveness, not with foregone conclusions. It is asked by a black man of another black man — those to whom so much poisonous meaning and deranged mythology have long been ascribed, those too often not deemed worthy to be given a chance to respond to this most fundamental of inquiries. —Melissa Anderson

For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24">For moreMoonlight: A question is posed to the main character of Barry Jenkins’ wondrous, superbly acted new film, Moonlight: “Who is you, man?” The beauty of Jenkins’ second feature, which follows his San Francisco–set black-boho romance Medicine for Melancholy (2008), radiates from the way that query is explored and answered: with specifics and expansiveness, not with foregone conclusions. It is asked by a black man of another black man — those to whom so much poisonous meaning and deranged mythology have long been ascribed, those too often not deemed worthy to be given a chance to respond to this most fundamental of inquiries. —Melissa Anderson

For more, read our review of Moonlight.; Credit: Courtesy of A24

Our film critics have a tough job, logging hours upon hours in front of the big screen. Sure, they see some good movies, but they see some not-so-great ones, too. Thankfully, they've weeded through the highs and lows to give you their picks for the best films of October 2016. If a few haven’t opened in a theater near you just yet, don’t fret: There’s always a chance you’ll be able to stream them on your small screen.