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Red Desert, "that I am condemning the inhuman industrialized world. ... My intention was to translate the poetry of that world, in which even factories can be beautiful. The lines and curves of the factories and their chimneys can be more beautiful than the outline of the trees." Zhao Liang might agree. The acclaimed Chinese documentarian and video artist assumes, in his new film Behemoth, a poetic view of industry — here made exquisite in its violence, ravishing in its destructive power. Much as Antonioni did in the petrochemical plants of Northern Italy, Zhao finds in the coal mines and ironworks of Inner Mongolia a devastating, infuriating splendor.

For more, read our review of Behemoth.; Credit: Courtesy Grasshopper Films">Behemoth: "It’s too simplistic to sayBehemoth: "It’s too simplistic to say,” Antonioni told Godard of his film Red Desert, "that I am condemning the inhuman industrialized world. ... My intention was to translate the poetry of that world, in which even factories can be beautiful. The lines and curves of the factories and their chimneys can be more beautiful than the outline of the trees." Zhao Liang might agree. The acclaimed Chinese documentarian and video artist assumes, in his new film Behemoth, a poetic view of industry — here made exquisite in its violence, ravishing in its destructive power. Much as Antonioni did in the petrochemical plants of Northern Italy, Zhao finds in the coal mines and ironworks of Inner Mongolia a devastating, infuriating splendor.

For more, read our review of Behemoth.; Credit: Courtesy Grasshopper Films
Red Desert, "that I am condemning the inhuman industrialized world. ... My intention was to translate the poetry of that world, in which even factories can be beautiful. The lines and curves of the factories and their chimneys can be more beautiful than the outline of the trees." Zhao Liang might agree. The acclaimed Chinese documentarian and video artist assumes, in his new film Behemoth, a poetic view of industry — here made exquisite in its violence, ravishing in its destructive power. Much as Antonioni did in the petrochemical plants of Northern Italy, Zhao finds in the coal mines and ironworks of Inner Mongolia a devastating, infuriating splendor.

For more, read our review of Behemoth.; Credit: Courtesy Grasshopper Films">Behemoth: "It’s too simplistic to sayBehemoth: "It’s too simplistic to say,” Antonioni told Godard of his film Red Desert, "that I am condemning the inhuman industrialized world. ... My intention was to translate the poetry of that world, in which even factories can be beautiful. The lines and curves of the factories and their chimneys can be more beautiful than the outline of the trees." Zhao Liang might agree. The acclaimed Chinese documentarian and video artist assumes, in his new film Behemoth, a poetic view of industry — here made exquisite in its violence, ravishing in its destructive power. Much as Antonioni did in the petrochemical plants of Northern Italy, Zhao finds in the coal mines and ironworks of Inner Mongolia a devastating, infuriating splendor.

For more, read our review of Behemoth.; Credit: Courtesy Grasshopper Films
Red Desert, "that I am condemning the inhuman industrialized world. ... My intention was to translate the poetry of that world, in which even factories can be beautiful. The lines and curves of the factories and their chimneys can be more beautiful than the outline of the trees." Zhao Liang might agree. The acclaimed Chinese documentarian and video artist assumes, in his new film Behemoth, a poetic view of industry — here made exquisite in its violence, ravishing in its destructive power. Much as Antonioni did in the petrochemical plants of Northern Italy, Zhao finds in the coal mines and ironworks of Inner Mongolia a devastating, infuriating splendor.

For more, read our review of Behemoth.; Credit: Courtesy Grasshopper Films">"that I am condemning the inhuman industrialized world. ... My intention was to translate the poetry of that worldBehemoth: "It’s too simplistic to say,” Antonioni told Godard of his film Red Desert, "that I am condemning the inhuman industrialized world. ... My intention was to translate the poetry of that world, in which even factories can be beautiful. The lines and curves of the factories and their chimneys can be more beautiful than the outline of the trees." Zhao Liang might agree. The acclaimed Chinese documentarian and video artist assumes, in his new film Behemoth, a poetic view of industry — here made exquisite in its violence, ravishing in its destructive power. Much as Antonioni did in the petrochemical plants of Northern Italy, Zhao finds in the coal mines and ironworks of Inner Mongolia a devastating, infuriating splendor.

For more, read our review of Behemoth.; Credit: Courtesy Grasshopper Films
Red Desert, "that I am condemning the inhuman industrialized world. ... My intention was to translate the poetry of that world, in which even factories can be beautiful. The lines and curves of the factories and their chimneys can be more beautiful than the outline of the trees." Zhao Liang might agree. The acclaimed Chinese documentarian and video artist assumes, in his new film Behemoth, a poetic view of industry — here made exquisite in its violence, ravishing in its destructive power. Much as Antonioni did in the petrochemical plants of Northern Italy, Zhao finds in the coal mines and ironworks of Inner Mongolia a devastating, infuriating splendor.

For more, read our review of Behemoth.; Credit: Courtesy Grasshopper Films">in his new film BehemothBehemoth: "It’s too simplistic to say,” Antonioni told Godard of his film Red Desert, "that I am condemning the inhuman industrialized world. ... My intention was to translate the poetry of that world, in which even factories can be beautiful. The lines and curves of the factories and their chimneys can be more beautiful than the outline of the trees." Zhao Liang might agree. The acclaimed Chinese documentarian and video artist assumes, in his new film Behemoth, a poetic view of industry — here made exquisite in its violence, ravishing in its destructive power. Much as Antonioni did in the petrochemical plants of Northern Italy, Zhao finds in the coal mines and ironworks of Inner Mongolia a devastating, infuriating splendor.

For more, read our review of Behemoth.; Credit: Courtesy Grasshopper Films
Red Desert, "that I am condemning the inhuman industrialized world. ... My intention was to translate the poetry of that world, in which even factories can be beautiful. The lines and curves of the factories and their chimneys can be more beautiful than the outline of the trees." Zhao Liang might agree. The acclaimed Chinese documentarian and video artist assumes, in his new film Behemoth, a poetic view of industry — here made exquisite in its violence, ravishing in its destructive power. Much as Antonioni did in the petrochemical plants of Northern Italy, Zhao finds in the coal mines and ironworks of Inner Mongolia a devastating, infuriating splendor.

For more, read our review of Behemoth.; Credit: Courtesy Grasshopper Films">ravishing in its destructive power. Much as Antonioni did in the petrochemical plants of Northern ItalyBehemoth: "It’s too simplistic to say,” Antonioni told Godard of his film Red Desert, "that I am condemning the inhuman industrialized world. ... My intention was to translate the poetry of that world, in which even factories can be beautiful. The lines and curves of the factories and their chimneys can be more beautiful than the outline of the trees." Zhao Liang might agree. The acclaimed Chinese documentarian and video artist assumes, in his new film Behemoth, a poetic view of industry — here made exquisite in its violence, ravishing in its destructive power. Much as Antonioni did in the petrochemical plants of Northern Italy, Zhao finds in the coal mines and ironworks of Inner Mongolia a devastating, infuriating splendor.

For more, read our review of Behemoth.; Credit: Courtesy Grasshopper Films
Red Desert, "that I am condemning the inhuman industrialized world. ... My intention was to translate the poetry of that world, in which even factories can be beautiful. The lines and curves of the factories and their chimneys can be more beautiful than the outline of the trees." Zhao Liang might agree. The acclaimed Chinese documentarian and video artist assumes, in his new film Behemoth, a poetic view of industry — here made exquisite in its violence, ravishing in its destructive power. Much as Antonioni did in the petrochemical plants of Northern Italy, Zhao finds in the coal mines and ironworks of Inner Mongolia a devastating, infuriating splendor.

For more, read our review of Behemoth.; Credit: Courtesy Grasshopper Films">infuriating splendor.Behemoth: "It’s too simplistic to say,” Antonioni told Godard of his film Red Desert, "that I am condemning the inhuman industrialized world. ... My intention was to translate the poetry of that world, in which even factories can be beautiful. The lines and curves of the factories and their chimneys can be more beautiful than the outline of the trees." Zhao Liang might agree. The acclaimed Chinese documentarian and video artist assumes, in his new film Behemoth, a poetic view of industry — here made exquisite in its violence, ravishing in its destructive power. Much as Antonioni did in the petrochemical plants of Northern Italy, Zhao finds in the coal mines and ironworks of Inner Mongolia a devastating, infuriating splendor.

For more, read our review of Behemoth.; Credit: Courtesy Grasshopper Films
For more" data-rightCaption="Behemoth: "It’s too simplistic to say,” Antonioni told Godard of his film Red Desert, "that I am condemning the inhuman industrialized world. ... My intention was to translate the poetry of that world, in which even factories can be beautiful. The lines and curves of the factories and their chimneys can be more beautiful than the outline of the trees." Zhao Liang might agree. The acclaimed Chinese documentarian and video artist assumes, in his new film Behemoth, a poetic view of industry — here made exquisite in its violence, ravishing in its destructive power. Much as Antonioni did in the petrochemical plants of Northern Italy, Zhao finds in the coal mines and ironworks of Inner Mongolia a devastating, infuriating splendor.

For more, read our review of Behemoth.; Credit: Courtesy Grasshopper Films">For moreBehemoth: "It’s too simplistic to say,” Antonioni told Godard of his film Red Desert, "that I am condemning the inhuman industrialized world. ... My intention was to translate the poetry of that world, in which even factories can be beautiful. The lines and curves of the factories and their chimneys can be more beautiful than the outline of the trees." Zhao Liang might agree. The acclaimed Chinese documentarian and video artist assumes, in his new film Behemoth, a poetic view of industry — here made exquisite in its violence, ravishing in its destructive power. Much as Antonioni did in the petrochemical plants of Northern Italy, Zhao finds in the coal mines and ironworks of Inner Mongolia a devastating, infuriating splendor.

For more, read our review of Behemoth.; Credit: Courtesy Grasshopper Films
Red Desert, "that I am condemning the inhuman industrialized world. ... My intention was to translate the poetry of that world, in which even factories can be beautiful. The lines and curves of the factories and their chimneys can be more beautiful than the outline of the trees." Zhao Liang might agree. The acclaimed Chinese documentarian and video artist assumes, in his new film Behemoth, a poetic view of industry — here made exquisite in its violence, ravishing in its destructive power. Much as Antonioni did in the petrochemical plants of Northern Italy, Zhao finds in the coal mines and ironworks of Inner Mongolia a devastating, infuriating splendor.

For more, read our review of Behemoth.; Credit: Courtesy Grasshopper Films">For moreBehemoth: "It’s too simplistic to say,” Antonioni told Godard of his film Red Desert, "that I am condemning the inhuman industrialized world. ... My intention was to translate the poetry of that world, in which even factories can be beautiful. The lines and curves of the factories and their chimneys can be more beautiful than the outline of the trees." Zhao Liang might agree. The acclaimed Chinese documentarian and video artist assumes, in his new film Behemoth, a poetic view of industry — here made exquisite in its violence, ravishing in its destructive power. Much as Antonioni did in the petrochemical plants of Northern Italy, Zhao finds in the coal mines and ironworks of Inner Mongolia a devastating, infuriating splendor.

For more, read our review of Behemoth.; Credit: Courtesy Grasshopper Films
Red Desert, "that I am condemning the inhuman industrialized world. ... My intention was to translate the poetry of that world, in which even factories can be beautiful. The lines and curves of the factories and their chimneys can be more beautiful than the outline of the trees." Zhao Liang might agree. The acclaimed Chinese documentarian and video artist assumes, in his new film Behemoth, a poetic view of industry — here made exquisite in its violence, ravishing in its destructive power. Much as Antonioni did in the petrochemical plants of Northern Italy, Zhao finds in the coal mines and ironworks of Inner Mongolia a devastating, infuriating splendor.

For more, read our review of Behemoth.; Credit: Courtesy Grasshopper Films">the online commentsBehemoth: "It’s too simplistic to say,” Antonioni told Godard of his film Red Desert, "that I am condemning the inhuman industrialized world. ... My intention was to translate the poetry of that world, in which even factories can be beautiful. The lines and curves of the factories and their chimneys can be more beautiful than the outline of the trees." Zhao Liang might agree. The acclaimed Chinese documentarian and video artist assumes, in his new film Behemoth, a poetic view of industry — here made exquisite in its violence, ravishing in its destructive power. Much as Antonioni did in the petrochemical plants of Northern Italy, Zhao finds in the coal mines and ironworks of Inner Mongolia a devastating, infuriating splendor.

For more, read our review of Behemoth.; Credit: Courtesy Grasshopper Films
Red Desert, "that I am condemning the inhuman industrialized world. ... My intention was to translate the poetry of that world, in which even factories can be beautiful. The lines and curves of the factories and their chimneys can be more beautiful than the outline of the trees." Zhao Liang might agree. The acclaimed Chinese documentarian and video artist assumes, in his new film Behemoth, a poetic view of industry — here made exquisite in its violence, ravishing in its destructive power. Much as Antonioni did in the petrochemical plants of Northern Italy, Zhao finds in the coal mines and ironworks of Inner Mongolia a devastating, infuriating splendor.

For more, read our review of Behemoth.; Credit: Courtesy Grasshopper Films">flooded in. Some were nastyBehemoth: "It’s too simplistic to say,” Antonioni told Godard of his film Red Desert, "that I am condemning the inhuman industrialized world. ... My intention was to translate the poetry of that world, in which even factories can be beautiful. The lines and curves of the factories and their chimneys can be more beautiful than the outline of the trees." Zhao Liang might agree. The acclaimed Chinese documentarian and video artist assumes, in his new film Behemoth, a poetic view of industry — here made exquisite in its violence, ravishing in its destructive power. Much as Antonioni did in the petrochemical plants of Northern Italy, Zhao finds in the coal mines and ironworks of Inner Mongolia a devastating, infuriating splendor.

For more, read our review of Behemoth.; Credit: Courtesy Grasshopper Films
Red Desert, "that I am condemning the inhuman industrialized world. ... My intention was to translate the poetry of that world, in which even factories can be beautiful. The lines and curves of the factories and their chimneys can be more beautiful than the outline of the trees." Zhao Liang might agree. The acclaimed Chinese documentarian and video artist assumes, in his new film Behemoth, a poetic view of industry — here made exquisite in its violence, ravishing in its destructive power. Much as Antonioni did in the petrochemical plants of Northern Italy, Zhao finds in the coal mines and ironworks of Inner Mongolia a devastating, infuriating splendor.

For more, read our review of Behemoth.; Credit: Courtesy Grasshopper Films">we see Maysoon JayyusiBehemoth: "It’s too simplistic to say,” Antonioni told Godard of his film Red Desert, "that I am condemning the inhuman industrialized world. ... My intention was to translate the poetry of that world, in which even factories can be beautiful. The lines and curves of the factories and their chimneys can be more beautiful than the outline of the trees." Zhao Liang might agree. The acclaimed Chinese documentarian and video artist assumes, in his new film Behemoth, a poetic view of industry — here made exquisite in its violence, ravishing in its destructive power. Much as Antonioni did in the petrochemical plants of Northern Italy, Zhao finds in the coal mines and ironworks of Inner Mongolia a devastating, infuriating splendor.

For more, read our review of Behemoth.; Credit: Courtesy Grasshopper Films
Red Desert, "that I am condemning the inhuman industrialized world. ... My intention was to translate the poetry of that world, in which even factories can be beautiful. The lines and curves of the factories and their chimneys can be more beautiful than the outline of the trees." Zhao Liang might agree. The acclaimed Chinese documentarian and video artist assumes, in his new film Behemoth, a poetic view of industry — here made exquisite in its violence, ravishing in its destructive power. Much as Antonioni did in the petrochemical plants of Northern Italy, Zhao finds in the coal mines and ironworks of Inner Mongolia a devastating, infuriating splendor.

For more, read our review of Behemoth.; Credit: Courtesy Grasshopper Films">dismiss the internet blatherBehemoth: "It’s too simplistic to say,” Antonioni told Godard of his film Red Desert, "that I am condemning the inhuman industrialized world. ... My intention was to translate the poetry of that world, in which even factories can be beautiful. The lines and curves of the factories and their chimneys can be more beautiful than the outline of the trees." Zhao Liang might agree. The acclaimed Chinese documentarian and video artist assumes, in his new film Behemoth, a poetic view of industry — here made exquisite in its violence, ravishing in its destructive power. Much as Antonioni did in the petrochemical plants of Northern Italy, Zhao finds in the coal mines and ironworks of Inner Mongolia a devastating, infuriating splendor.

For more, read our review of Behemoth.; Credit: Courtesy Grasshopper Films
Red Desert, "that I am condemning the inhuman industrialized world. ... My intention was to translate the poetry of that world, in which even factories can be beautiful. The lines and curves of the factories and their chimneys can be more beautiful than the outline of the trees." Zhao Liang might agree. The acclaimed Chinese documentarian and video artist assumes, in his new film Behemoth, a poetic view of industry — here made exquisite in its violence, ravishing in its destructive power. Much as Antonioni did in the petrochemical plants of Northern Italy, Zhao finds in the coal mines and ironworks of Inner Mongolia a devastating, infuriating splendor.

For more, read our review of Behemoth.; Credit: Courtesy Grasshopper Films">liberating Palestine and this girl's talent are all important." As the head of Speed SistersBehemoth: "It’s too simplistic to say,” Antonioni told Godard of his film Red Desert, "that I am condemning the inhuman industrialized world. ... My intention was to translate the poetry of that world, in which even factories can be beautiful. The lines and curves of the factories and their chimneys can be more beautiful than the outline of the trees." Zhao Liang might agree. The acclaimed Chinese documentarian and video artist assumes, in his new film Behemoth, a poetic view of industry — here made exquisite in its violence, ravishing in its destructive power. Much as Antonioni did in the petrochemical plants of Northern Italy, Zhao finds in the coal mines and ironworks of Inner Mongolia a devastating, infuriating splendor.

For more, read our review of Behemoth.; Credit: Courtesy Grasshopper Films
Red Desert, "that I am condemning the inhuman industrialized world. ... My intention was to translate the poetry of that world, in which even factories can be beautiful. The lines and curves of the factories and their chimneys can be more beautiful than the outline of the trees." Zhao Liang might agree. The acclaimed Chinese documentarian and video artist assumes, in his new film Behemoth, a poetic view of industry — here made exquisite in its violence, ravishing in its destructive power. Much as Antonioni did in the petrochemical plants of Northern Italy, Zhao finds in the coal mines and ironworks of Inner Mongolia a devastating, infuriating splendor.

For more, read our review of Behemoth.; Credit: Courtesy Grasshopper Films">Maysoon knows that the very fact of her team's existence is a radical act of resistance. Director Amber Fares takes the stories of the racers just as seriouslyBehemoth: "It’s too simplistic to say,” Antonioni told Godard of his film Red Desert, "that I am condemning the inhuman industrialized world. ... My intention was to translate the poetry of that world, in which even factories can be beautiful. The lines and curves of the factories and their chimneys can be more beautiful than the outline of the trees." Zhao Liang might agree. The acclaimed Chinese documentarian and video artist assumes, in his new film Behemoth, a poetic view of industry — here made exquisite in its violence, ravishing in its destructive power. Much as Antonioni did in the petrochemical plants of Northern Italy, Zhao finds in the coal mines and ironworks of Inner Mongolia a devastating, infuriating splendor.

For more, read our review of Behemoth.; Credit: Courtesy Grasshopper Films
Red Desert, "that I am condemning the inhuman industrialized world. ... My intention was to translate the poetry of that world, in which even factories can be beautiful. The lines and curves of the factories and their chimneys can be more beautiful than the outline of the trees." Zhao Liang might agree. The acclaimed Chinese documentarian and video artist assumes, in his new film Behemoth, a poetic view of industry — here made exquisite in its violence, ravishing in its destructive power. Much as Antonioni did in the petrochemical plants of Northern Italy, Zhao finds in the coal mines and ironworks of Inner Mongolia a devastating, infuriating splendor.

For more, read our review of Behemoth.; Credit: Courtesy Grasshopper Films">as Maysoon does.Behemoth: "It’s too simplistic to say,” Antonioni told Godard of his film Red Desert, "that I am condemning the inhuman industrialized world. ... My intention was to translate the poetry of that world, in which even factories can be beautiful. The lines and curves of the factories and their chimneys can be more beautiful than the outline of the trees." Zhao Liang might agree. The acclaimed Chinese documentarian and video artist assumes, in his new film Behemoth, a poetic view of industry — here made exquisite in its violence, ravishing in its destructive power. Much as Antonioni did in the petrochemical plants of Northern Italy, Zhao finds in the coal mines and ironworks of Inner Mongolia a devastating, infuriating splendor.

For more, read our review of Behemoth.; Credit: Courtesy Grasshopper Films
For more" data-rightCaption="Behemoth: "It’s too simplistic to say,” Antonioni told Godard of his film Red Desert, "that I am condemning the inhuman industrialized world. ... My intention was to translate the poetry of that world, in which even factories can be beautiful. The lines and curves of the factories and their chimneys can be more beautiful than the outline of the trees." Zhao Liang might agree. The acclaimed Chinese documentarian and video artist assumes, in his new film Behemoth, a poetic view of industry — here made exquisite in its violence, ravishing in its destructive power. Much as Antonioni did in the petrochemical plants of Northern Italy, Zhao finds in the coal mines and ironworks of Inner Mongolia a devastating, infuriating splendor.

For more, read our review of Behemoth.; Credit: Courtesy Grasshopper Films">For moreBehemoth: "It’s too simplistic to say,” Antonioni told Godard of his film Red Desert, "that I am condemning the inhuman industrialized world. ... My intention was to translate the poetry of that world, in which even factories can be beautiful. The lines and curves of the factories and their chimneys can be more beautiful than the outline of the trees." Zhao Liang might agree. The acclaimed Chinese documentarian and video artist assumes, in his new film Behemoth, a poetic view of industry — here made exquisite in its violence, ravishing in its destructive power. Much as Antonioni did in the petrochemical plants of Northern Italy, Zhao finds in the coal mines and ironworks of Inner Mongolia a devastating, infuriating splendor.

For more, read our review of Behemoth.; Credit: Courtesy Grasshopper Films

Watching movies for a living is a tough job, but somebody's got to do it, and our film critics are up to the task. While they see plenty of stellar movies, they see some not-so-great ones, too. They've weeded through them all to give you their picks for the best films of January and February 2017. If a few haven’t opened in a theater near you just yet, don’t fret: There’s always a chance you’ll be able to stream them on your small screen, or they may go into wider release in March.