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Our Critics' Picks for Movies to See ASAP


For more, read our review of Paint It Black.; Credit: Courtesy Imagination Worldwide">Paint It Black: Amber TamblynPaint It Black: Amber Tamblyn, the actress, author and filmmaker, doesn’t bother with coyness when it comes to her influences. “The movie I saw in my head was Grey Gardens directed by David Lynch,” she writes in the press notes for her debut feature, Paint It Black, based on Janet Fitch’s 2006 novel. The film itself proves more entrancing than the imitative mashup that logline suggests. Tamblyn (and Ed Dougherty, who co-wrote the adaptation with her) has shaped Fitch’s book into an actress’s duel and duet in which Alia Shawkat and Janet McTeer torment each other in a starting-to-molder Echo Park mansion. The dress-up and the passing manias are too poisonous to suggest the Maysleses’ immortal study of the two Edith Beales, and McTeer’s character, world-class pianist Meredith, keeps a gleaming Steinway in the house rather than raccoons. Instead, Tamblyn arcs toward Lynch, celebrating and interrogating the roles that actresses have played in his films. Here it’s a dead boy that plunges us into the underworld.

For more, read our review of Paint It Black.; Credit: Courtesy Imagination Worldwide
For more, read our review of Paint It Black.; Credit: Courtesy Imagination Worldwide">Paint It Black: Amber TamblynPaint It Black: Amber Tamblyn, the actress, author and filmmaker, doesn’t bother with coyness when it comes to her influences. “The movie I saw in my head was Grey Gardens directed by David Lynch,” she writes in the press notes for her debut feature, Paint It Black, based on Janet Fitch’s 2006 novel. The film itself proves more entrancing than the imitative mashup that logline suggests. Tamblyn (and Ed Dougherty, who co-wrote the adaptation with her) has shaped Fitch’s book into an actress’s duel and duet in which Alia Shawkat and Janet McTeer torment each other in a starting-to-molder Echo Park mansion. The dress-up and the passing manias are too poisonous to suggest the Maysleses’ immortal study of the two Edith Beales, and McTeer’s character, world-class pianist Meredith, keeps a gleaming Steinway in the house rather than raccoons. Instead, Tamblyn arcs toward Lynch, celebrating and interrogating the roles that actresses have played in his films. Here it’s a dead boy that plunges us into the underworld.

For more, read our review of Paint It Black.; Credit: Courtesy Imagination Worldwide
For more, read our review of Paint It Black.; Credit: Courtesy Imagination Worldwide">author and filmmakerPaint It Black: Amber Tamblyn, the actress, author and filmmaker, doesn’t bother with coyness when it comes to her influences. “The movie I saw in my head was Grey Gardens directed by David Lynch,” she writes in the press notes for her debut feature, Paint It Black, based on Janet Fitch’s 2006 novel. The film itself proves more entrancing than the imitative mashup that logline suggests. Tamblyn (and Ed Dougherty, who co-wrote the adaptation with her) has shaped Fitch’s book into an actress’s duel and duet in which Alia Shawkat and Janet McTeer torment each other in a starting-to-molder Echo Park mansion. The dress-up and the passing manias are too poisonous to suggest the Maysleses’ immortal study of the two Edith Beales, and McTeer’s character, world-class pianist Meredith, keeps a gleaming Steinway in the house rather than raccoons. Instead, Tamblyn arcs toward Lynch, celebrating and interrogating the roles that actresses have played in his films. Here it’s a dead boy that plunges us into the underworld.

For more, read our review of Paint It Black.; Credit: Courtesy Imagination Worldwide
For more, read our review of Paint It Black.; Credit: Courtesy Imagination Worldwide">” she writes in the press notes for her debut featurePaint It Black: Amber Tamblyn, the actress, author and filmmaker, doesn’t bother with coyness when it comes to her influences. “The movie I saw in my head was Grey Gardens directed by David Lynch,” she writes in the press notes for her debut feature, Paint It Black, based on Janet Fitch’s 2006 novel. The film itself proves more entrancing than the imitative mashup that logline suggests. Tamblyn (and Ed Dougherty, who co-wrote the adaptation with her) has shaped Fitch’s book into an actress’s duel and duet in which Alia Shawkat and Janet McTeer torment each other in a starting-to-molder Echo Park mansion. The dress-up and the passing manias are too poisonous to suggest the Maysleses’ immortal study of the two Edith Beales, and McTeer’s character, world-class pianist Meredith, keeps a gleaming Steinway in the house rather than raccoons. Instead, Tamblyn arcs toward Lynch, celebrating and interrogating the roles that actresses have played in his films. Here it’s a dead boy that plunges us into the underworld.

For more, read our review of Paint It Black.; Credit: Courtesy Imagination Worldwide
For more, read our review of Paint It Black.; Credit: Courtesy Imagination Worldwide">based on Janet Fitch’s 2006 novel. The film itself proves more entrancing than the imitative mashup that logline suggests. Tamblyn (and Ed DoughertyPaint It Black: Amber Tamblyn, the actress, author and filmmaker, doesn’t bother with coyness when it comes to her influences. “The movie I saw in my head was Grey Gardens directed by David Lynch,” she writes in the press notes for her debut feature, Paint It Black, based on Janet Fitch’s 2006 novel. The film itself proves more entrancing than the imitative mashup that logline suggests. Tamblyn (and Ed Dougherty, who co-wrote the adaptation with her) has shaped Fitch’s book into an actress’s duel and duet in which Alia Shawkat and Janet McTeer torment each other in a starting-to-molder Echo Park mansion. The dress-up and the passing manias are too poisonous to suggest the Maysleses’ immortal study of the two Edith Beales, and McTeer’s character, world-class pianist Meredith, keeps a gleaming Steinway in the house rather than raccoons. Instead, Tamblyn arcs toward Lynch, celebrating and interrogating the roles that actresses have played in his films. Here it’s a dead boy that plunges us into the underworld.

For more, read our review of Paint It Black.; Credit: Courtesy Imagination Worldwide
For more, read our review of Paint It Black.; Credit: Courtesy Imagination Worldwide">and McTeer’s characterPaint It Black: Amber Tamblyn, the actress, author and filmmaker, doesn’t bother with coyness when it comes to her influences. “The movie I saw in my head was Grey Gardens directed by David Lynch,” she writes in the press notes for her debut feature, Paint It Black, based on Janet Fitch’s 2006 novel. The film itself proves more entrancing than the imitative mashup that logline suggests. Tamblyn (and Ed Dougherty, who co-wrote the adaptation with her) has shaped Fitch’s book into an actress’s duel and duet in which Alia Shawkat and Janet McTeer torment each other in a starting-to-molder Echo Park mansion. The dress-up and the passing manias are too poisonous to suggest the Maysleses’ immortal study of the two Edith Beales, and McTeer’s character, world-class pianist Meredith, keeps a gleaming Steinway in the house rather than raccoons. Instead, Tamblyn arcs toward Lynch, celebrating and interrogating the roles that actresses have played in his films. Here it’s a dead boy that plunges us into the underworld.

For more, read our review of Paint It Black.; Credit: Courtesy Imagination Worldwide
For more, read our review of Paint It Black.; Credit: Courtesy Imagination Worldwide">keeps a gleaming Steinway in the house rather than raccoons. InsteadPaint It Black: Amber Tamblyn, the actress, author and filmmaker, doesn’t bother with coyness when it comes to her influences. “The movie I saw in my head was Grey Gardens directed by David Lynch,” she writes in the press notes for her debut feature, Paint It Black, based on Janet Fitch’s 2006 novel. The film itself proves more entrancing than the imitative mashup that logline suggests. Tamblyn (and Ed Dougherty, who co-wrote the adaptation with her) has shaped Fitch’s book into an actress’s duel and duet in which Alia Shawkat and Janet McTeer torment each other in a starting-to-molder Echo Park mansion. The dress-up and the passing manias are too poisonous to suggest the Maysleses’ immortal study of the two Edith Beales, and McTeer’s character, world-class pianist Meredith, keeps a gleaming Steinway in the house rather than raccoons. Instead, Tamblyn arcs toward Lynch, celebrating and interrogating the roles that actresses have played in his films. Here it’s a dead boy that plunges us into the underworld.

For more, read our review of Paint It Black.; Credit: Courtesy Imagination Worldwide
For more, read our review of Paint It Black.; Credit: Courtesy Imagination Worldwide">celebrating and interrogating the roles that actresses have played in his films. Here it’s a dead boy that plunges us into the underworld.Paint It Black: Amber Tamblyn, the actress, author and filmmaker, doesn’t bother with coyness when it comes to her influences. “The movie I saw in my head was Grey Gardens directed by David Lynch,” she writes in the press notes for her debut feature, Paint It Black, based on Janet Fitch’s 2006 novel. The film itself proves more entrancing than the imitative mashup that logline suggests. Tamblyn (and Ed Dougherty, who co-wrote the adaptation with her) has shaped Fitch’s book into an actress’s duel and duet in which Alia Shawkat and Janet McTeer torment each other in a starting-to-molder Echo Park mansion. The dress-up and the passing manias are too poisonous to suggest the Maysleses’ immortal study of the two Edith Beales, and McTeer’s character, world-class pianist Meredith, keeps a gleaming Steinway in the house rather than raccoons. Instead, Tamblyn arcs toward Lynch, celebrating and interrogating the roles that actresses have played in his films. Here it’s a dead boy that plunges us into the underworld.

For more, read our review of Paint It Black.; Credit: Courtesy Imagination Worldwide
For more" data-rightCaption="Paint It Black: Amber Tamblyn, the actress, author and filmmaker, doesn’t bother with coyness when it comes to her influences. “The movie I saw in my head was Grey Gardens directed by David Lynch,” she writes in the press notes for her debut feature, Paint It Black, based on Janet Fitch’s 2006 novel. The film itself proves more entrancing than the imitative mashup that logline suggests. Tamblyn (and Ed Dougherty, who co-wrote the adaptation with her) has shaped Fitch’s book into an actress’s duel and duet in which Alia Shawkat and Janet McTeer torment each other in a starting-to-molder Echo Park mansion. The dress-up and the passing manias are too poisonous to suggest the Maysleses’ immortal study of the two Edith Beales, and McTeer’s character, world-class pianist Meredith, keeps a gleaming Steinway in the house rather than raccoons. Instead, Tamblyn arcs toward Lynch, celebrating and interrogating the roles that actresses have played in his films. Here it’s a dead boy that plunges us into the underworld.

For more, read our review of Paint It Black.; Credit: Courtesy Imagination Worldwide">

For more
Paint It Black: Amber Tamblyn, the actress, author and filmmaker, doesn’t bother with coyness when it comes to her influences. “The movie I saw in my head was Grey Gardens directed by David Lynch,” she writes in the press notes for her debut feature, Paint It Black, based on Janet Fitch’s 2006 novel. The film itself proves more entrancing than the imitative mashup that logline suggests. Tamblyn (and Ed Dougherty, who co-wrote the adaptation with her) has shaped Fitch’s book into an actress’s duel and duet in which Alia Shawkat and Janet McTeer torment each other in a starting-to-molder Echo Park mansion. The dress-up and the passing manias are too poisonous to suggest the Maysleses’ immortal study of the two Edith Beales, and McTeer’s character, world-class pianist Meredith, keeps a gleaming Steinway in the house rather than raccoons. Instead, Tamblyn arcs toward Lynch, celebrating and interrogating the roles that actresses have played in his films. Here it’s a dead boy that plunges us into the underworld.

For more, read our review of Paint It Black.; Credit: Courtesy Imagination Worldwide
For more, read our review of Paint It Black.; Credit: Courtesy Imagination Worldwide">

For more
Paint It Black: Amber Tamblyn, the actress, author and filmmaker, doesn’t bother with coyness when it comes to her influences. “The movie I saw in my head was Grey Gardens directed by David Lynch,” she writes in the press notes for her debut feature, Paint It Black, based on Janet Fitch’s 2006 novel. The film itself proves more entrancing than the imitative mashup that logline suggests. Tamblyn (and Ed Dougherty, who co-wrote the adaptation with her) has shaped Fitch’s book into an actress’s duel and duet in which Alia Shawkat and Janet McTeer torment each other in a starting-to-molder Echo Park mansion. The dress-up and the passing manias are too poisonous to suggest the Maysleses’ immortal study of the two Edith Beales, and McTeer’s character, world-class pianist Meredith, keeps a gleaming Steinway in the house rather than raccoons. Instead, Tamblyn arcs toward Lynch, celebrating and interrogating the roles that actresses have played in his films. Here it’s a dead boy that plunges us into the underworld.

For more, read our review of Paint It Black.; Credit: Courtesy Imagination Worldwide
For more, read our review of Paint It Black.; Credit: Courtesy Imagination Worldwide">but such is the case in Abacus: Small Enough to JailPaint It Black: Amber Tamblyn, the actress, author and filmmaker, doesn’t bother with coyness when it comes to her influences. “The movie I saw in my head was Grey Gardens directed by David Lynch,” she writes in the press notes for her debut feature, Paint It Black, based on Janet Fitch’s 2006 novel. The film itself proves more entrancing than the imitative mashup that logline suggests. Tamblyn (and Ed Dougherty, who co-wrote the adaptation with her) has shaped Fitch’s book into an actress’s duel and duet in which Alia Shawkat and Janet McTeer torment each other in a starting-to-molder Echo Park mansion. The dress-up and the passing manias are too poisonous to suggest the Maysleses’ immortal study of the two Edith Beales, and McTeer’s character, world-class pianist Meredith, keeps a gleaming Steinway in the house rather than raccoons. Instead, Tamblyn arcs toward Lynch, celebrating and interrogating the roles that actresses have played in his films. Here it’s a dead boy that plunges us into the underworld.

For more, read our review of Paint It Black.; Credit: Courtesy Imagination Worldwide
For more, read our review of Paint It Black.; Credit: Courtesy Imagination Worldwide">whose patriarchPaint It Black: Amber Tamblyn, the actress, author and filmmaker, doesn’t bother with coyness when it comes to her influences. “The movie I saw in my head was Grey Gardens directed by David Lynch,” she writes in the press notes for her debut feature, Paint It Black, based on Janet Fitch’s 2006 novel. The film itself proves more entrancing than the imitative mashup that logline suggests. Tamblyn (and Ed Dougherty, who co-wrote the adaptation with her) has shaped Fitch’s book into an actress’s duel and duet in which Alia Shawkat and Janet McTeer torment each other in a starting-to-molder Echo Park mansion. The dress-up and the passing manias are too poisonous to suggest the Maysleses’ immortal study of the two Edith Beales, and McTeer’s character, world-class pianist Meredith, keeps a gleaming Steinway in the house rather than raccoons. Instead, Tamblyn arcs toward Lynch, celebrating and interrogating the roles that actresses have played in his films. Here it’s a dead boy that plunges us into the underworld.

For more, read our review of Paint It Black.; Credit: Courtesy Imagination Worldwide
For more, read our review of Paint It Black.; Credit: Courtesy Imagination Worldwide">founded Abacus Federal Savings Bank in New York’s Chinatown in the 1980s. The recurring references to It’s a Wonderful Life from Thomas (who fancies himself Jimmy Stewart’s small-town heart of goldPaint It Black: Amber Tamblyn, the actress, author and filmmaker, doesn’t bother with coyness when it comes to her influences. “The movie I saw in my head was Grey Gardens directed by David Lynch,” she writes in the press notes for her debut feature, Paint It Black, based on Janet Fitch’s 2006 novel. The film itself proves more entrancing than the imitative mashup that logline suggests. Tamblyn (and Ed Dougherty, who co-wrote the adaptation with her) has shaped Fitch’s book into an actress’s duel and duet in which Alia Shawkat and Janet McTeer torment each other in a starting-to-molder Echo Park mansion. The dress-up and the passing manias are too poisonous to suggest the Maysleses’ immortal study of the two Edith Beales, and McTeer’s character, world-class pianist Meredith, keeps a gleaming Steinway in the house rather than raccoons. Instead, Tamblyn arcs toward Lynch, celebrating and interrogating the roles that actresses have played in his films. Here it’s a dead boy that plunges us into the underworld.

For more, read our review of Paint It Black.; Credit: Courtesy Imagination Worldwide
For more, read our review of Paint It Black.; Credit: Courtesy Imagination Worldwide">as Abacus became the only bank indicted during the 2008 financial crisis.Paint It Black: Amber Tamblyn, the actress, author and filmmaker, doesn’t bother with coyness when it comes to her influences. “The movie I saw in my head was Grey Gardens directed by David Lynch,” she writes in the press notes for her debut feature, Paint It Black, based on Janet Fitch’s 2006 novel. The film itself proves more entrancing than the imitative mashup that logline suggests. Tamblyn (and Ed Dougherty, who co-wrote the adaptation with her) has shaped Fitch’s book into an actress’s duel and duet in which Alia Shawkat and Janet McTeer torment each other in a starting-to-molder Echo Park mansion. The dress-up and the passing manias are too poisonous to suggest the Maysleses’ immortal study of the two Edith Beales, and McTeer’s character, world-class pianist Meredith, keeps a gleaming Steinway in the house rather than raccoons. Instead, Tamblyn arcs toward Lynch, celebrating and interrogating the roles that actresses have played in his films. Here it’s a dead boy that plunges us into the underworld.

For more, read our review of Paint It Black.; Credit: Courtesy Imagination Worldwide

Watching movies for a living is a tough job, but somebody's got to do it, and our film critics are up to the task. While they see plenty of stellar movies, they see some not-so-great ones, too. They've weeded through them all to give you their picks for the best films of May 2017. If a few haven’t opened in a theater near you just yet, don’t fret: There’s always a chance you’ll be able to stream them on your small screen, or they may go into wider release in the coming months.