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R.I.P. Stan LeeEXPAND
R.I.P. Stan Lee
Gage Skidmore

10 of the Best Marvel Comics Movie Soundtracks

Following the sad news of Marvel big cheese and comic book Stan Lee's death at the age of 95, tributes have been pouring in from all corners. We thought we'd take a look at 10 awesome pieces of music from Marvel movies and TV shows. Of course, making these lists comprehensive is impossible, so we've tried to make it varied and eclectic, pulling from all genres in music, as well as cartoons, live-action TV and big-budget motion pictures. Let us know if we missed your personal fave.

1. Spider-Man (1960s cartoon)

What could be more iconic? People who have never seen the 1960s animated Spider-Man series know the words "Spider-Man, Spider-Man, does whatever a spider can" as soon as they hear it. So ingrained in pop culture is it that Homer Simpson famously changed the words to "Spider-Pig" in a fan-favorite episode of The Simpsons. To this day, it's the tune most closely associated with the web-slinger, despite numerous other TV shows and many movies.

2. Blade (vampire dance club theme) aka "Confusion (Dub — Extended Edit)" by The Pump Panel

The scene is intense. Vampires are dancing passionately in an underground warehouse club, the music picks up pace, and then the drop. Blood comes pouring from the ceiling, and said vamps go ape-shit crazy. The Pump Panel's "Confusion" was the perfect soundtrack to bloodsucking comic-horror joy.

3. The X-Men cartoon theme

Second only to the 1960s Spider-Man, the ’90s X-Men had the coolest cartoon theme. Wolverine's blades slashing, Storm's storm, the battle scenes — the music was appropriately dramatic and remains memorable.

4. Evanescence — Bring Me to Life (Daredevil movie)

Ben Affleck's Daredevil movie isn't fondly remembered, and it's almost been wiped from memory thanks to the recent and excellent Netflix TV show. But hey, the Elektra spinoff was worse. And in fact, the director's cut of the Man Without Fear movie is worth another look. The Evanescence hit was popular with goth-metal kids regardless of its Marvel connection, but that did provide extra melodrama.

5. Avengers: Infinity Wars

With the Marvel Cinematic Universe colliding for the third time, this time with the much-heralded inclusion of Spider-Man, our heroes took on the might of intergalactic uber-villain Thanos, and the score was suitably epic.

6. Daredevil (TV show)

Now in its third season, the Daredevil Netflix TV show all but eclipsed the 2003 movie thanks in part to Charlie Cox's phenomenal performance as Matt Murdoch. The rest of the cast was excellent, too, in a show that formed part of the Defenders corner of the Marvel Universe. Dark and moody, the music matches beautifully.

7. Luke Cage (TV show)

Another awesome show from the Marvel Netflix canon, although sadly Luke Cage was canceled after two seasons. The guy also appeared in The Defenders alongside Daredevil, Jessica Jones and Iron Fist, and there are rumors that Cage (aka Power Man) and Iron Fist will return in a "Heroes for Hire" series. Anyway, Cage's show will be missed, not least because of the incredible, hip-hop–heavy soundtrack.

8. Thor
A movie about Norse gods battling frost giants and the like needs an epic score, something to really shake Odin to his Asgardian core. Patrick Doyle provided exactly that.

9. The Incredible Hulk (TV show)

For a long time, Bill Bixby and Lou Ferrigno as David Banner/The Hulk was the only quality live-action representation of a Marvel character. Note: Banner's first name was changed to David for the show because TV execs decided that the comic-accurate "Bruce" sounded too gay (true story). But anyway, the "Lonely Man" closing theme is hauntingly memorable. How will Banner ever settle? The man can't keep his temper. IT'S SAD!

10. Spider-Man (movie)

Sam Raimi's 2002 Spider-Man movie, and the two subsequent sequels, brought Marvel's most popular character swinging into the modern world and, alongside the X-Men films, provided a bridge between the TV shows of the 1970s and ’80s and the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Danny "Oingo Boingo" Elfman contributed a score that was suitably dramatic and anthemic.