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Garden

Tuesday, January 7, 2014

Tuesday, January 7, 2014

Beer

Angel City Brewery Raising Rooftop Hops for Special Brew

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Tue, Jan 7, 2014 at 6:00 AM

the garden atop Angel City Brewery - RAY NARKEVICIUS
  • Ray Narkevicius
  • the garden atop Angel City Brewery
Angel City Brewery is taking the farm-to-table concept to new heights with a rooftop hops garden whose harvest has yielded a unique brew only available in downtown L.A.

The craft brewery's urban garden is a work in progress, but Dieter Foerstner, Angel City's brewmaster, expects that by next fall patrons at the Angel City's public house will be able to enjoy its (copyrighted) "rooftop" brew.

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Wednesday, August 14, 2013

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

Garden

Cast Your Vote in Snoop Lion's Adopt-A-Garden Contest

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Wed, Aug 14, 2013 at 12:38 PM

Community garden - MIND GARDENS
  • Mind Gardens
  • Community garden
We've seen Snoop Dogg Lion, née Calvin Broadus, Jr., transform from a rapper who helped put G-funk permanently on the sonic map into a multi-hyphenate entertainer. Through his non-profit organization Mind Gardens with John Paul DiJoria (Paul Mitchell, Patrón), we can add local food activist to the range. Bringing its community garden initiative launched last year in Kingston, Jamaica, Mind Gardens has chosen four gardens in Los Angeles to highlight in its "Adopt-A-Garden" contest, running until next Wednesday, August 21. And you can decide on which you'd prefer to see win the grand prize through the Facebook page of Mind Garden's local partner in philanthropy Reed's Ginger Brew.

Little Green Fingers, L.A. CAN Rooftop Garden, EnrichLA Community Garden and Walter Reed Middle School are among the local gardens in L.A. up for consideration, eligible for either first ($2,000), second ($1,000), third ($500) or fourth ($250) place. They were selected in large part because they've demonstrated a shared philosophy in community and youth education through gardening.

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Monday, May 13, 2013

Christy Wilhelmi in her garden - COURTESY: CHRISTY WILHELMI
  • courtesy: Christy Wilhelmi
  • Christy Wilhelmi in her garden
What is it about Christy Wilhelmi's three-minute tip-of-the-week podcast Gardenerd that makes it feel like essential listening? Is it that it's so short and informative? Or maybe that Wilhelmi's pealing bell voice makes everything garden-related -- even getting rid of pesky powdery mildew -- sound easy? Whatever it is, just as the former private school fundraiser turned full-time professional garden expert was preparing to start another draft of a gardening novel she'd been working on, Massachusetts-based Adams Media commissioned her to write a how-to handbook.

Published last month, it's called Gardening for Geeks, and has a subtitle that comes with a promise: DIY Tests, Gadgets, and Techniques That Utiltize Microbiology, Mathematics, and Ecology to Exponentially Maximize the Yield of Your Garden.

Recently we spoke to Wilhelmi, who held forth on all manner of garden-related subjects, including the best starter crop for newbie gardeners, why growing your own grain might be ultimately unsatisfying, and what she discovers during house calls.

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Tuesday, March 12, 2013

One of the gardens Ron Finley has planted in South Central - SCREENSHOT FROM RON FINLEY'S TED TALK
  • Screenshot from Ron Finley's TED talk
  • One of the gardens Ron Finley has planted in South Central
Ron Finley is a gardener, but not in the puttering-in-the-backyard kind of way. Rather, the artist and designer refers to himself as a "guerrilla gardener," using the growing of food as a way to try to change the dynamics of his neighborhood: South Central L.A.

In a TED talk, given in Long Beach in February and just recently posted online, Finley talks about his neighborhood as a food desert and community devastated by food-related illnesses. "South Central: The home of the drive-by and the drive-thru," he says. "The drive-thrus are killing more people than the drive-bys."

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Thursday, August 30, 2012

DIY: Homemade apartment-window liqueur - JGARBEE
  • JGarbee
  • DIY: Homemade apartment-window liqueur
Holiday traffic, bars reeking of stale beer, hoards of people intent on their last beach fling. Ah, Labor Day weekend fun. Actually, it's the perfect excuse to stay home and channel your inner Euell Gibbons and forage for backyard cattails.

Or, if you're not swamp-adjacent, build a mini-winery in your hall closet. Plant that trellised vegetable garden on your apartment patio, the one you've been saying all summer you're going to finish. Distill something or, if you prefer to keep things legal, make homemade liqueur with summer fruit (photo above). All good, old-fashioned hard work, but not in that paint-the-kitchen literal "laboring" sense. It's Labor Day weekend, but also the end of summer, so we might as well have some fun.

Get the resources you need to make that home winery (!), trellised garden and other projects after the jump.

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Thursday, August 23, 2012

EMILY GREEN
  • Emily Green

There's a wheelbarrow in the kitchen. How it got there doesn't bear thinking about. The moment for thought is long gone. With every bang of my shin on the barrow, it dawns on me that this is only the first load of many of oranges, lemons and tangerines that needs picking, trimming, washing, drying, sizing and packing in the 18 hours before I debut at the Altadena Farmers Market.

The good news is that my hands no longer hurt. The bad news? They have no sensation whatsoever.

Folly this painful generally starts with an oversight. In my case, it was a 2011 move to an Altadena house where the enormous backyard held the remnants of an old citrus farm. I took the majestic orange, lemon and tangerine trees as little more than scenery when signing the deed. Soon, however, catching the fruit proved the single most difficult job in the garden. Letting it hang ripe indefinitely on the trees or molder on the ground was only an option if I wanted rats.

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Friday, June 15, 2012

John Sedlar loves that Latin produce. - TOMOKO KUROKAWA
  • Tomoko Kurokawa
  • John Sedlar loves that Latin produce.
Strange things have been afoot on the rooftop at John Sedlar's Playa. For the past couple of months, the restaurant has been installing and planting a rather large rooftop garden (you may have noticed a crane doing some heavy lifting along Beverly Boulevard back in March) meant to provide Sedlar's kitchen and bar with a fresh variety of hard-to-find ingredients. The actual garden is laid out vertically. As Sedlar explains, "We considered several different systems, including raised container beds and a greenhouse, before finally settling on one we decided would be best: an aeroponic technology based on a system of 35 towers we have installed on our roof, each with 28 pots per 5-foot tower."

Word has arrived that the first round of crops from what's been dubbed the cielo verde (green sky) is ripe and ready to make its debut. On June 21 from 6:30-8:30 p.m., Playa will host a garden grand opening party complete with bites by Sedlar and summer cocktails by Julian Cox -- both featuring the new rooftop-to-table produce. [We just received word that this party is not open to the public. 12:07 p.m.

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Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Books

Michelle Obama's White House Kitchen Garden Book Out Today

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Tue, May 29, 2012 at 7:07 AM

AMAZON
  • Amazon
Michelle Obama's first book, American Grown: The Story of the White House Kitchen Garden and Gardens Across America, hits the bookstores today. Just in time for summertime gardening, for your kids' summer vacation projects (Cook your own dinner! Build your own compost bin!), and even for a season of happy political cooking.

The 271-page book, published by Crown Publishers, considers the raised vegetable beds on the South Lawn as a paradigm for the growth of America's children. Obama has made her "Let's Move" campaign and a focus on healthful eating central features of her own White House tenure.

The First Lady's book tells the story of the White House Kitchen Garden, from behind-the-scenes "Will my garden grow?" moments to recipes for the abundant produce that is eventually harvested. Obama traces the history of the White House garden from its first planting on March 20, 2009, through the its current state, including photographs of both garden and harvest.

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Wednesday, May 23, 2012

AMAZON.COM
  • amazon.com
Grow, Cook, Eat by Willi Galloway is a handy little book, despite the entertainingly transparent subtitle: A Food Lover's Guide to Vegetable Gardening Including 50 Recipes, Plus Harvesting and Storage Tips. If you're spending your Saturday tending to your vegetable garden rather than pruning roses, we're pretty sure you're more likely an avid "food lover" than a weekend scented-candlemaker sort.

Semantics aside, it's simply a long-winded reminder that agents or publishers often come up with titles and book jacket cover blurbs, not authors, as the book itself is a fun little reference guide. Expect an encyclopedic layout, only here in a large-format, photo-driven style that makes those monologues on growing onions more engaging. In each vegetable category you'll find basics on growing, say, spinach and mustard greens followed by several recipes (spinach risotto, mustard green turnovers).

A side note: Check out Galloway's blog for community garden-friendly vegetable trellis and other handy summer "How not to grow a tomato" ideas. But first, get the rest of our review, and Galloway's citrusy roasted beet recipe, after the jump.

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Thursday, May 3, 2012

Thursday, May 3, 2012

Garden

Post & Beam Launches Gardening Club This Weekend

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Thu, May 3, 2012 at 2:43 PM

Chef Govind Armstrong in the Post & Beam garden - GUZZLEANDNOSH
  • GuzzleandNosh
  • Chef Govind Armstrong in the Post & Beam garden
Looking to get dirty this weekend? Baldwin Hill's Post & Beam is launching the first of its summer series of Gardening Club workshops this weekend with help from horticulturalist Geri Miller and head chef Govind Armstrong. The arrival of spring means that vegetables like basil, peppers, squash, eggplant and heirloom tomatoes are being planted in the restaurant's sprawling patio garden, which will serve as the classroom for those interested in honing their green thumb.

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