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Coffee

31-Ounce "Trenta" Coming Soon to Starbucks: A Bit Much?

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Mon, Jan 17, 2011 at 2:08 PM
click to enlarge Tall is really not so much anymore. - MARCO ARMENT/FLICKR

Like any good fast food chain, Starbucks is supersizing. The Informer let us know this morning that come February 1, the coffee purveyor will unveil the new 31-ounce Trenta size, making the 24-ounce Venti seem suddenly "girlyman."

Trenta will only be an option for iced coffee, iced tea and lemonade though, which is a bit of an anticlimax, considering the ice to beverage ratio in those tend to favor the former. Maybe with 31 ounces we can finally get a decent pour.

More than anything, though, this stirs up our mixed feelings about Starbucks. We loathe that it's basically the Walmart of coffeeshops. We hate that it (allegedly) uses cheap beans and overroasts them so they taste better. But still, we find ourselves there all the time. It's so damn convenient. And unlike Dunkin' Donuts and McCafe, Starbucks coffee actually works. No groggy mid-morning slump from under-caffeination.

Still, this only invites Europeans and Aussies to further make fun of our oversized American habits since, not surprisingly, this is only a U.S. thing thus far.

Will you be too embarrassed to order a Trenta, or are you counting down the days?

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