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Food in Movies

Not The Same Old Plate Of Sugar Cookies: Top 10 Food Scenes In Xmas Movies

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Wed, Dec 1, 2010 at 9:00 AM
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What is it with Christmas movies and food? Whether it's George Bailey borrowing his mother's good dishes for the high school dance in It's a Wonderful Life or Ralphie's little brother showing Mom "how the piggie eats" in A Christmas Story, eating is inextricably linked with holiday festivities on screen and off. As research for his latest guide Have Yourself A Movie Little Christmas (Limelight) film critic Alonso Duralde watched more than 122 films. That makes him our official Yuletide movie expert. Here, Duralde ticks off ten memorable big screen Xmas food moments.

10. About a Boy

This Nick Hornby adaptation gives us two Christmas dinners that show exactly what's going on with the characters: midway through the film, there's a gathering that's cramped and awkward and tedious and quite possibly vegan, but then the film ends with a much more glorious meal, filled with wonder and warmth, and the characters happy and fulfilled, and the option of either meat or veggie main courses.

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9. Brazil

Christmas imagery runs rampant throughout Terry Gilliam's futuristic dystopia, from sinister Santas to the half-opened presents that people keep giving our hero, Sam Lowery (Jonathan Pryce). One of the film's many brilliant throwaway gags involves a swanky restaurant (which, like all the other public spaces in the film, has huge and ugly industrial ducts snaking from floor to ceiling) featuring light-up menus with gorgeous-looking entrees, even though patrons actually get served a brightly colored lump of what appears to be some kind of terrifying hominy-mashed potatoes hybrid.

8. La Bûche

The title refers to the rich Yule-log cake dessert -- although Charlotte Gainsbourg's holiday-hating character in the film says the treat "makes me want to throw up" -- but much of the movie revolves around Emmanuelle Béart knocking herself out trying to prepare the perfect holiday feast, not that anyone in her family appreciates her efforts, least of all her adulterous husband. (She's got her own thing going on the side with a wholesale grocer.) Catastrophe strikes when Béart finishes trussing up the turkey, only to discover that her sister Sabine Azéma has forgotten to stuff it with truffles, which apparently is French for "you've ruined Christmas."

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7. Christmas in Connecticut

Barbara Stanwyck stars in this comedy as a 1940s version of Martha Stewart, a newspaper columnist beloved from coast to coast for her articles about gourmet cooking and looking after her husband and baby in a rustic Connecticut farmhouse. Trouble is, she's a sham -- a bachelor girl who can't even boil water, living in a Manhattan walk-up and relying on the restaurant downstairs to keep her fed. But when the magazine's owner sends a war hero to spend Christmas with her as a publicity stunt, she's got to come up with the house, the husband, the baby... and the ability to make a traditional holiday dinner from scratch.

6. The Dead

Almost all of John Huston's haunting final film, based on the short story by James Joyce, takes place at the annual Feast of the Epiphany dinner hosted by the elderly Morkan sisters in 1904 Dublin. While tales are exchanged over the table (and a great deal of port is consumed by some of the guests), it's the after-dinner entertainment that causes Gretta Conroy (Angelica Huston) to remember suddenly the lost love of her youth, bringing the tale to its stirring and poignant climax.

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