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Food Trucks

Here Comes Another Taco Truck: Free Tacos That Taste of Tequila + A Recipe

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Tue, Jun 1, 2010 at 8:00 AM

click to enlarge tequilatacotruck.jpg
Ho hum, another taco truck is rolling out. But wait until you hear what this one has to offer -- free tacos and taco fillings that are laced with tequila. The truck will travel all over Los Angeles and environs, starting with a launch in Glendale today, June 1st. During the next two months it will make 120 stops, at least one of which may be in your neighborhood.

You'll owe your free taco to Familia Camarena Tequila, a recently launched brand of 100% blue agave tequila. There are two, a silver and a reposado, produced from agave grown in the Los Altos region of Jalisco. Right now, they're available only in California and Nevada.

These are the tequilas to be used in the taco fillings and other truck fare. The Camarena taco truck lets you be among the first to taste them, not in straight shots, but safely cooked and de-spirited so that you can drive away in good conscience.

The truck's menu includes carne asada tacos with tomatillo salsa, onions and cilantro; chicken tacos with onions, cilantro, Mexican crema and salsa verde; a burrito filled with shredded carnitas, rice and beans, and a vegetarian tostada topped with refried beans, shredded romaine, crumbled cotija cheese and salsa roja.

Camarena Tequila chose Chef Sevan Azarian of Recess Eatery in Glendale to develop the recipes, and the launch will take place at Recess, 1102 N. Brand Blvd., from 7 to 10 p.m. Tuesday, June 1st.

After that, you can track the truck through its website, Facebook page, and Twitter feed, which will all go live on launch day.

If you like what you taste, you can have as many tacos as you like. The catch is, you have to make them yourself, using Chef Azarian's recipe and, the sponsors hope, their tequila.

Camarena Carne Asada Tacos

From: Sevan Azarian

Makes: 6 or more servings.

1 1/2 pounds boneless beef top sirloin, cut into thin bite-size slices

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Crushed red pepper to taste

4 ounces (1/2 cup) tequila

1 lime

1 (28-ounce) can tomatillos

2 jalapeno chiles, seeded

4 tablespoons canola oil

1 (10.5 ounce) can beef broth

12 (3-inch) corn tortillas

1/2 large onion, chopped

1 bunch cilantro, chopped

Lemon wedges

1. Place the sliced meat in a shallow bowl, and season with salt, black pepper and crushed red pepper. Pour in the tequila and squeeze the lime juice over the meat. Turn until evenly coated. Cover and refrigerate for 30 minutes.

2. In a blender or food processor, combine the tomatillos and jalapenos. Process until pureed and thick, 15 to 20 seconds.

3. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a large skillet over medium high heat. Pour in the tomatillo mixture. Cook, stirring frequently, for 5 minutes. Stir in the beef broth. Reduce the heat, and simmer for 20 to 30 minutes, or until the mixture coats a spoon. Transfer to a bowl.

4. Heat another 1 tablespoon oil in a large skillet over high heat. Stir in 1/3 of the beef, and sauté for 1 minute, or until browned. Transfer to a serving dish. Repeat with the remaining oil and beef, in two batches. Meanwhile, heat the tortillas, wrapped in foil, in a 350-degree oven.

5. For each taco, place 2 tortillas on top of each other. Add some of the meat and top with tomatillo sauce, onions and cilantro. Garnish with a wedge of lemon, to be squeezed over the taco before eating.

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