In L.A., Everything Is Fine: The Wonderfully Weird Los Angeles of David Lynch

In L.A., Everything Is Fine: The Wonderfully Weird Los Angeles of David Lynch

In the press kit for Lost Highway, David Lynch was asked if the 1997 film could have taken place in any other city besides Los Angeles. In typical Lynchian fashion he responded, "Perhaps, but you don't know how it would affect it. The place, the light and the feet — all these things come with the knowledge that you are looking for things to flesh out your ideas, make them more right. For me, L.A. was the right place."

Though the notion of L.A.'s perpetual golden light — not sure about the feet, though — is something filmmakers have been attracted to for decades, the city's daylight, and the night light for that matter, is something completely different in the hands of Lynch. Through his lens, Los Angeles becomes a mystical place of good witches, magicians, mystery men, cowboys and demons.

With the recent return of Lynch's Twin Peaks, we revisited some of the L.A. filming locations to six of the auteur's works: Eraserhead, Wild at Heart, Lost Highway, Mulholland Drive, Inland Empire and the original Twin Peaks.

For more great Twin Peaks locations of L.A. check out In Twin Peaks, which includes a great map of the series' Franklin Canyon locations.

All photos by Jared Cowan except where noted. Please keep in mind that some of these locations are on private property. Do not trespass or disturb the owners. Follow Jared on Twitter at @JaredCowan1.


In the press kit for Lost Highway, David Lynch was asked if the 1997 film could have taken place in any other city besides Los Angeles. In typical Lynchian fashion he responded, "Perhaps, but you don't know how it would affect it. The place, the light and the feet — all these things come with the knowledge that you are looking for things to flesh out your ideas, make them more right. For me, L.A. was the right place."

Though the notion of L.A.'s perpetual golden light — not sure about the feet, though — is something filmmakers have been attracted to for decades, the city's daylight, and the night light for that matter, is something completely different in the hands of Lynch. Through his lens, Los Angeles becomes a mystical place of good witches, magicians, mystery men, cowboys and demons.

With the recent return of Lynch's Twin Peaks, we revisited some of the L.A. filming locations to six of the auteur's works: Eraserhead, Wild at Heart, Lost Highway, Mulholland Drive, Inland Empire and the original Twin Peaks.

For more great Twin Peaks locations of L.A. check out In Twin Peaks, which includes a great map of the series' Franklin Canyon locations.

All photos by Jared Cowan except where noted. Please keep in mind that some of these locations are on private property. Do not trespass or disturb the owners. Follow Jared on Twitter at @JaredCowan1.
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