10 of Our Favorite Vintage Bars in L.A.

The next time a friend asks you to recommend a hip, new place to drink, might we suggest that you instead rattle off a timeless, old place to drink. Because while the former runs a high risk of being overcrowded or overrated, the dive bars, tiki bars, old bars and older bars listed below will be (slightly) less crowded and infinitely more reliable. So raise a glass — be it a martini coupe, a frosty mug of PBR or a tiki tumbler — to these classic establishments that have withstood the test of time.

Chez Jay
Chez Jay
Colin Young-Wolff

Chez Jay

For nearly 60 years, Chez Jay has been Santa Monica's most star-studded nocturnal hangout, spanning the Rat Pack, the Brat Pack and beyond. Alan Shepard brought one of the bar's peanuts to outer space and back; dubbed the "Astro-nut," it now sits in a co-owner's safe deposit box. Lee Marvin once rode in through the front door on a motorcycle. Staying at his brother-in-law's beachfront pad, President John F. Kennedy used to send a car to pick up a gorgeous blonde patron out back. (Her name was Marilyn Monroe.) The Beach Boys escaped the sun there. David E. Kelley and Michelle Pfeiffer had their first date there. The Murray brothers, Bill and Brian, had their mail delivered there. Ben Affleck, Matt Damon and Quentin Tarantino massaged scripts in a back room, where Henry Kissinger and various political bigwigs often held court. But Chez Jay isn't just a haven for celebrities — and the luminaries would just as soon blend right in with the crusty regulars. —Mike Seely

1657 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica; (310) 395-1741, chezjays.com.

Damon's
Damon's
Anne Fishbein

Damon’s

The front entrance of Damon's in Glendale may be the most subtle tiki façade in town. But once you get inside, there are no punches pulled. It is fully tiki-ed out, with thatched walls and tropical plants and fake huts and bamboo-coated pillars, a look that suggests not so much an actual island bar as a sensationalized midcentury vision of one. The cocktail menu has a large handful of well-made tiki drinks and bar classics — and the tiki drinks are legitimately fabulous, particularly the mai tai and the chi chi. They are fruity without tasting like corn syrup and creamy without reaching sludgy milkshake viscosity. These drinks are also stronger than they taste, and if you come on the right night — Monday for mai tais and Tuesday for chi chis — they are shockingly cheap. No matter how many you have, you'll never drink enough to convince yourself that Damon's is a tropical paradise, but you may drink yourself back to a time when it kinda-sorta looked like one. —Ben Mesirow

317 N. Brand Blvd., Glendale; (818) 507-1510, damonsglendale.com.

The Dresden
The Dresden
Jared Cowan

The Dresden

Perhaps no other film depicts the reality of young people chasing the Hollywood dream quite like 1996's Swingers — and the location that's most closely associated with Swingers is the Dresden. The Los Feliz restaurant and lounge was established in 1954, and it was Vince Vaughn's relationship with the late owner, Carl Ferraro, that allowed the filmmakers the ability to shoot there. "It was a place I started coming to before I was 21. Is that bad to say?" Vaughn says on the DVD commentary. Not only did the film make the Dresden a must-see destination for out-of-towners but an international audience also has discovered the bar's 35-year resident lounge act, Marty & Elayne. —Jared Cowan

1760 N. Vermont Ave., Los Feliz; (323) 665-4294.

The Frolic Room
The Frolic Room
Jared Cowan

The Frolic Room

When a friend comes to town, why not take them to where Bukowski drank? Hollywood's Frolic Room is one of the only places Bukowski obsessives agree that he actually haunted, and a portrait of him hangs above the cash register. But you don't have to be a Bukowski fan to appreciate a good dive bar and, thanks to gentrification, Hollywood boasts precious few these days. The Frolic Room has been around since Prohibition ended and continues to offer a paradoxically classy dive-bar ambience. Bartenders aren't overly tattooed, out-of-work actors but suited gentlemen who will remember your favorite spirits every time you step in. The walls feature caricatures of Groucho Marx and Albert Einstein, two people who almost certainly never drank here but whose images provide a kitschy, old-school charm. —Nicholas Pell

6245 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood; (323) 462-5890.

Golden Gopher
Golden Gopher
Kelsee Becker

Golden Gopher

With a punk rock–filled jukebox, a photo booth and vintage arcade games like Ms. Pac-Man, this downtown dive bar may well be one of the best in Los Angeles. But what makes the Golden Gopher truly remarkable is its special liquor license, which was grandfathered in from 1905 and still allows the sale of beer, wine and liquor as takeout. Hence the bar's slogan: "Liquor here, liquor to go." At its counter, not only does the Golden Gopher sell six-packs of local and craft beers and a huge selection of Scotch and Irish whisky — you also can pick up condoms, mints and soaps in preparation for the wild night you might have after Golden Gopher closes at 2 a.m. Not feeling so lucky? As a $50 consolation prize, you can take home your own golden-gopher statuette. —Jennifer Swann

417 W. Eighth St., downtown; (213) 614-8001, goldengopherbar.com.



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