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Ten Things to Cook During Carmageddon

Bibimbap Plating by Lisa Gilliam
Bibimbap Plating by Lisa Gilliam
Susan Park

You either planned ahead or you didn't for feeding yourself during carmageddon. If you're a planner, this weekend is perfect for making dishes that take all day or even two days. If you're not a planner, well, clean out your pantry and refrigerator to scrounge for ingredients. Regardless, if you live near the 405, you've probably resigned yourself to staying home this weekend. Unless you really planned ahead and left town.

It's a good weekend for preparing dishes that take a long time or trying to figure out what to prepare with ingredients at hand. Ten suggestions for cooking this weekend after the jump.

1. No-knead bread. It's an easy recipe, but the 12-18 hour resting time means you have to block out a certain number of hours to baby sit the dough until it's ready. No, you don't have to literally watch it during 6 hour window, but you'll have to be in the vicinity when it's ready for shaping.

Susan Park's Croissant Dough
Susan Park's Croissant Dough
Susan Park

2. Croissants. Note the recipe calls for chilling the dough for an hour in between folds, then chilling for at least 8 hours, no more than 18 hours before baking. This is a recipe that will own you for two days.

3. Cassoulet. The ingredient list is insane and the method is protracted over three days. That means you have to start soaking the beans this evening for a Sunday cassoulet dinner. Think of it has a figurative weekend getaway to Toulouse, France.

4. Birria. Yeah, we're shilling our own recipe. But hanging out with your friends outdoors with an 18 pack of beer will probably be more fun than watching bread dough rise, butter chill, or turning on the oven for cassoulet.

Baby Carrots
Baby Carrots
Susan Park

5. Cook baby carrots. Real baby carrots, not the supermarket plastic wrapped ones that are actually carved from big horse carrots. If you shop at farmers' markets, you've seen those pretty bundles of baby carrots covered with grit that's not easy to wash off. And if you've ever tried peeling them, you know that they are prone to breaking or you end up with a little whittled stick of carrot. Baby carrots should be scraped clean with a paring knife. Take a paring knife and gently scrape off the skin and pockets of grit. This is a fine dining technique that takes a long time, but the results are worth it: perfectly intact and clean baby carrots.



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