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Recipe for Foie Gras Fingerling Potato Chips: Or, More Fun with Potatoes and Animal Fat + Wine Pairing

Foie Gras Fat Fingerling Potato Chips
Foie Gras Fat Fingerling Potato Chips
Susan Park

If you imagine that Test Kitchen has a full pantry of ingredients from all over the world, including luxury products like foie gras, you would be correct. We happen to have half a case of IQF frozen foie gras in our freezer. We use them to make pâtés and terrines. However, we realize that most home cooks, or even chefs, don't have extravagantly stocked freezers, so we suggest substituting rendered duck fat or even schmaltz, instead of foie gras for fingerling potato chips. On the other hand, if you happen to have some horse fat...

The trick to fingerling potato chips is to slice the potatoes as thinly as possible. If you need to brush up on your knife skills, use a mandoline instead.

Fingerling Potato Chips

From: Farid Zadi

Notes: To render foie gras into fat, place a two inch piece of it in a saute pan over medium heat, until there is nothing but a pool of liver fat and a little foie gras crackling. If you're using duck fat or schmaltz, use approximately 2-3 tablespoons per batch. These chips just beg for specialty salts. We suggest Guérande sea salt or making your own spiced kosher salt by adding spices such as dried lime powder, cumin or chili pepper powder.

Makes: enough to garnish 12 fine-dining entree garnishes or enough for 1 small child as a snack.

1 dozen fingerling potatoes, sliced lengthwise ( no more than 1/8 inch thick)

2-3 tablespoons of animal fat per batch

Salt to taste

1. Heat the fat in a saute pan over medium high heat, place a single layer of sliced fingerlings in the pan and cook for 2-3 minutes or until they are golden brown and crispy. Turn the potatoes and cook the other side until golden brown and crispy. Sprinkle with salt and serve immediately.

Wine Pairing

From: David Haskell of Magnum

Rosso Wine Shop: Ch. Ripalle, 2008

Glendale: Price: $12.99:

Grape: Chasselas

Region: Savoie, France:

Chasselas is grape usualy found in Switzerland or Alsace; it's one of the oldest grapes found. This wine has dried peach and almond overtones, but also has still strong acids. My favorite aspect of this pairing will be with the Potato chips rendered in duck fat. The texture of the chip will cause a sparkle in your mouth ,causing even more of the peach to come out.

Follow David Haskell on Twitter.

Farid Zadi is the Dean of Culinary Arts at Ecole de Cuisine. You can follow him on twitter or join him on Facebook.


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