How a Sardine Surplus in India May Change Our Daily Diet

Portugeuse packed sardines
Portugeuse packed sardines

Sardines may not be what's for regular seafood dinners in Los Angeles, unlike in Mumbai where there is plenty to be found at a local wholesale fish market. There is a more direct tie, however, between L.A. and Mumbai seafood supplies than a comparison of what goes onto one's dinner plate. As reported by the Christian Science Monitor, the glut of sardines in the Indian Ocean is a snapshot of greater shifts in both food provenance and distribution the world over.

As a result of a rise in temperature, sardines are becoming more common at Indian markets; the traditional maple syrup season is shortening in the United States; and England is witnessing a Mediterranean climate fit for growing olives, grapes, and apricots. These are just a few flashpoints redrawing the global map of food resources.

A small, oily fish from the herring family, sardines used to be a power player in California's commercial fishery. That was until they were almost extinct from overfishing. In L.A., a series of ebbs and flows in sardine supply has historically had a significant effect on the fishing industry. By 1905, for one thing, tuna canning had become more prominent due to a decrease of sardines, according to a timeline from the Port of Los Angeles.

And in somewhat related news:

- 5 Food Trends We're Thankful For: An Antidote To Whiny Food Writer Syndrome

- A Recipe For Sardine-Stuffed Piquillo Peppers with Lemony Greens and Whole-Wheat Croutons

- 10 Best Seafood Tacos in Los Angeles

Want more Squid Ink? Follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook. Follow the author on Twitter at @chrstnchiao.

Sponsor Content


All-access pass to top stories, events and offers around town.

Sign Up >

No Thanks!

Remind Me Later >