Get The Chef A Drink: What 10 LA Chefs Pour When They Need a Stiff One

Two waiters didn't show up for their shift, the rookie line cook spilled vinegar on the $500 truffle, and Kogi just had to park a few feet from the valet stand. How do chefs cope when Saturday night's dinner service turns into a Kitchen Nightmares episode? Sometimes they pour themselves a stiff drink.

Of the chefs we polled, cheap beer, the occasional cocktail and even filtered water are the drinks that often make late night appearances in kitchens around town. But hands down it's whiskey, whether southern, Irish or Scottish, that is the most preferred chef sipping spirit. Seeing as it is Monday, the one day many chefs do take off, we suspect right now these guys are kicking back in their PJs, turning up the Willie tunes and refilling their rocks glasses. Find out who does tequila shots after the jump.

Hey, Who's Been Drinking The Highland Park?
Hey, Who's Been Drinking The Highland Park?
Jenn Garbee

Casey Lane, executive chef at The Tasting Kitchen: Knob Creek bourbon, straight up.

Michael Fiorelli, executive chef at Mar'sel: Tequila and Tecate (a shot of tequila with a chaser of Tecate beer).

Albert Aviles, executive chef at Corkbar: Fernet-Branca (an Italian bitters liqueur) and soda.

Kuniko Yagi, chef de cuisine at Sona: Mojito (rum, lime juice, mint, simple syrup).

Josiah Citrin, executive chef at Melisse and Cache: A glass of good French red wine, like the Cabernet Franc from the Loire Valley that he popped for posole night.

Ray Garcia, executive chef at Fig: Single Malt Scotch from the Highlands region.

Warren Schwartz, executive chef at Westside Tavern: Organic Casa Noble Añejo (Añejo is a tequila aged a minimum of one year in oak barrels).

Brian Moyers, chef de cuisine at BLT Steak: Sierra Nevada pale ale or a Spiced Mule (spiced rum, lime juice, ginger, soda).

Andrew Kirschner, executive chef at Wilshire: A carafe of ice cold water.

Evan Funke, executive chef at Rustic Canyon: Jameson Irish whiskey on the rocks in a pint glass (16 ounces), as opposed to a rocks glass (5 ounces).

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