Shrimp
Shrimp
Clarissa Wei

Everything You Need to Prepare for the Chinese New Year Celebration

This Chinese New Year, the year of the Rooster, begins on Jan. 28 and lasts until Feb. 15, 2018. China's most important traditional festival means parades, fireworks and, of course, food. Here's everything you need to know about the amazing Chinese cuisine found in L.A.

Seek Out These Lunar New Year Food Staples From China, Korea, Japan and Vietnam
Happy Year of the Rooster! This year, the Lunar New Year falls on Jan. 28.  It's a two-week-long celebration beginning with the first new moon of the lunar calendar and ending 15 days later on the first full moon. Traditionally meant to commemorate new beginnings and the start of the new harvest season, the holiday is a time when families around the globe reunite for an epic feast.

Read the full L.A. Weekly article here.

Chinese New Year feast in ChinaEXPAND
Chinese New Year feast in China
Clarissa Wei

Eat These 10 Essential Chinese New Year Dishes
There are a lot of symbolic dishes served during Chinese New Year. Each individual dish is steeped in tradition and its name is a homonym for a particular wish for the upcoming year, such as "have a lot of fun" or "make a lot of money."

Read the full L.A. Weekly article here.

Get Introduced to Hot Pot at Hai Di Lao, a Mall Restaurant With Personality
Perhaps the best thing about getting hot pot at Hai Di Lao is that it needn't be a communal experience.
The term "hot pot" refers to a style of dining wherein a big container of boiling liquid is placed on the table, and eaters can drop in proteins and vegetables at their leisure.

Read the full L.A. Weekly article here.

Everything You Need to Prepare for the Chinese New Year CelebrationEXPAND
Danny Liao

Asian Fusion Gets Sophisticated at StopBye Cafe in Lawndale
StopBye Cafe has been quietly dishing out fine "Asian Fusion Cuisine" at nearly fast-food prices for the better part of six months now. The Lilliputian space has barely enough room for the open kitchen and maybe five small tables. A few paintings and ceremonial tapestries decorate the white walls.

Read the full L.A. Weekly article here.

A Chinatown restaurant in 1948
A Chinatown restaurant in 1948
Courtesy Los Angeles Public Library

As Chinatown Changes, the Neighborhood's Chinese Restaurants Move Away From Cantonese Food
From the 19th century to the late 1960s, Chinese food in America in general and in Los Angeles' Chinatown in particular was exclusively Cantonese in origin.

Read the full L.A. Weekly article here.

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