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Culinary Comeback: Home Butchery Class

Culinary Comeback: Home Butchery Class
Felicia Friesema

Home butchery is the new backyard chicken coop. And sure, you could watch and learn about whole beast butchery from the comfort of your own iPad. But video won't tell you what it feels like when the knife in your hand hits tendon or bone or what that seam between the muscles feels like under a layer of fat. For that, you'll need a hands-on class, and the ladies from the secret supper club, Chicks with Knives, will be teaching one on June 26th.

Chef Rachael Narins, one half of the Chicks with Knives (Pastry Chef Suzanne Griswold is the other half), says that home butchery is about mindful involvement in what you eat. And we'll agree it's harder to disconnect from the filet on your plate when you've removed it from the animal's body yourself. But there's also a deep satisfaction in learning what is fast becoming a lost culinary skill. "We love introducing people to lost culinary arts," Narins says, who is an avid pickler and fermenter. "Butchery is a great way to step into a deeper understanding of your food."

Along with giving you an added bit of kitchen cred among your gaggle of epicurean friends, you'll also save a sheepload of money - butchering a whole lamb or chicken yourself can save you almost 50% off the price of the final product and you get a treasure trove of soup and stock bones to boot. The class is $125 and the Chicks ask that you bring your own boning and chef's knife (they'll have extras on hand in case you don't have these). But at the end of the day, you get to take home the mountain of meat pieces that you carve. Space is very limited so interested students should register quickly.

Chicken butchery from the last Chicks with Knives class
Chicken butchery from the last Chicks with Knives class
Felicia Friesema

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