Public Spectacle | Los Angeles News and Events | LA Weekly
Loading...

Friday, October 17, 2014

Friday, October 17, 2014

Film and TV

Film Podcast: Dear White People, Go See Dear White People

Comments (1)

By

Fri, Oct 17, 2014 at 5:46 PM
dear-white-people.jpg

With the news that Paul Feig is going to reboot Ghostbusters with an all-female cast, we wonder on this week's Voice Film Club podcast what it would be like if they re-did another '80s classic: Young Guns. We then move onto the latest Brad Pitt World War II movie, Fury, which is ultra violent. Amy Nicholson of LA Weekly says, "I like a war movie where they talk about how war is just really awful...this is muddy in-the-trenches war movie." Joined as always by Alan Scherstuhl and Stephanie Zacharek of the Village Voice, the trio then moves onto Justin Simien's much-anticipated new film, Dear White People (be sure to read our interview with Simien), and then to post-apocalyptic Western Young Ones, written and directed by Jake Paltrow.

More »

modern-vampire-movies.jpg

Our review of this week's Dracula Untold doesn't inspire much hope: "This Dracula Begins-style sword-and-fangs curio plays like someone said, 'What if we took a vampire flick but did a find-and-replace swapping out all that bare-neck sensuality for some video-game ass-kicking?'"

But for every genre-entry failure, there are numerous other modern vampire movies that manage to plumb and toy with the creature's mythology in imaginative ways. The breadth of the directors featured in our slideshow — from French auteur Claire Denis to Germany's Werner Herzog to American mavericks Jim Jarmusch and Francis Ford Coppola — speaks to the wide variety of voices that have tackled the genre with such ingenuity in recent decades. — Danny King

More »

Blackout House (2:14) from Voice Media Group on Vimeo.

Two years ago, we warned you about Blackout House, the creepiest haunted house in the nation, asking you to imagine "somehow finding yourself among a group of apprehensive 'fresh fish' being badgered and browbeaten by a brutal prison guard" or exiting an elevator on the wrong floor only to find "a labyrinthine, sensual inferno in which you fall under the absolute control of mostly unseen sadistic psychotics."

Blackout House is back, throwing its doors open on Oct. 16 at 500 Mateo Street in the Arts District in Downtown Los Angeles, and they're up to their sick fun of binding and blinding you while "running, pushing and prodding you through a harrowing gauntlet of sexual abasement and humiliating physical and psychic tortures."

They let L.A. Weekly peek behind the scene during final dress rehearsal and set-decorating, and we got a bit inside the heads of the actors and designers:

More »

BJ_Headshot_with_book_border.jpg

More »

L-R: Jessica Lowe & Melissa Hunter - NOAM BLEIWEISS
  • Noam Bleiweiss
  • L-R: Jessica Lowe & Melissa Hunter

Plenty of shows explore the drama going down at Hollywood’s hottest parties. But what about the drama going down in the backseats of Uber cars on the way to those Hollywood parties, between passengers who have no hope of getting in?

Backseat Bitches is the latest web series from Above Average, the digital arm of Saturday Night Live creator Lorne Michaels’ production company, Broadway Video. It follows two hashtagging, instagramming, flask-sipping, leopard-clad BFFs, Jinny and Mimi, as they zip around L.A. to Macaulay Culkin’s birthday party and other events to which they are not invited.

More »

In Bert Rodriguez's A Word of Advice, the artist spent all day in a bubble bath inside a tent, answering questions like a fortune teller. - COURTESY OF BERT RODRIGUEZ
  • Courtesy of Bert Rodriguez
  • In Bert Rodriguez's A Word of Advice, the artist spent all day in a bubble bath inside a tent, answering questions like a fortune teller.

Bert Rodriguez is doing a piece of performance art. It's called Without You I'm Nothing, and it's billed as "a lecture, conversation and four-course dinner," in which a new, original artwork will be revealed by the evening's end. But right now it apparently involves Rodriguez drunkenly telling the story of his first marriage.

The marriage, as he describes it, was his seminal work, the first of many pranklike performance art pieces that won him renown from his base in Miami and, now, L.A.

"It was my first year in college, and I had this psych class," Rodriguez tells the crowd of about 40 people, mostly men, who've paid $150 each to attend. "I picked the cutest girl in class. I told her that I just wanted a legal marriage, and that we'd get divorced after a year."

More »

Meachan Rath gets "Konko'ed" at Victory Lap. - LINAS PHILLIPS
  • Linas Phillips
  • Meachan Rath gets "Konko'ed" at Victory Lap.
This week is all about fun, funky, free festivals happening all over Los Angeles – a '70s TV show celebration in Beverly Hills, a Skid Row art festival, a Halloween-themed variety show at the Virgil, and Lit Crawl – the best-read bar crawl NoHo has ever seen. Too punk to party with the mainstream? Head to Pasadena for a free talk on punk's origins in L.A., from the folks who were really there. 

More »

Thursday, October 16, 2014

Thursday, October 16, 2014

Theater

Haters and Lovers in Venus in Fur and Banshee

Comments (1)

By

Thu, Oct 16, 2014 at 6:30 AM
Graham Hamilton and Jaimi Paige in Venus in Fur - PHOTO BY DEBORA ROBINSON/SCR
  • Photo by Debora Robinson/SCR
  • Graham Hamilton and Jaimi Paige in Venus in Fur

David Ives' Tony-nominated 2010 sexual comedy, Venus in Fur, is to eroticism what Yasmina Reza's Art is to painting. Both are beguiling, erudite parlor games that keep fluttering around the issues they purport to investigate.

Venus in Fur, now at South Coast Repertory and the basis of Roman Polanski's recent movie of that name, has only two characters: a veteran New York playwright and first-time director, Thomas (Graham Hamilton); and an actress, Vanda (Jaimi Paige), auditioning for Thomas, alone in a rehearsal room, for a production of his latest work. That would be an adaptation of the 1870 novel Venus in Furs by the Austrian author Leopold von Sacher-Masoch — "Masoch" being the root of the oft-used term masochism. Masoch's book is a series of conversations about power and surrendering it sexually and spiritually, centered on a needy, melancholic fellow named Severin, who is also the central character in Thomas' play-within-Ives' play.

More »

Rhapsody in Taps - PHOTO COURTESY OF RHAPSODY IN TAPS
  • Photo courtesy of Rhapsody in Taps
  • Rhapsody in Taps

This week's dance shows include the last chance for Invertigo's dance/drama, the return of Rhapsody in Taps and Los Angeles Ballet's Swan Lake flying into Westwood.

5. Just winging it

Rhapsody In Taps’ artistic director Linda Sohl-Ellison and her rhythm tappers are accompanied by jazz and world music performed live in this 33rd annual concert. Guest artist Lane Alexander displays tap’s affinity for classical music, performing to Bach’s French and English Suites. Tickets at www.rhapsodyintaps.com. At Aratani Japan America Theatre, 244 S. San Pedro St., dwntwn.; Sat., Oct. 18, 7:30 p.m., $25-$40. 213-680-3700, www.jaccc.org.

More »

George Villas, left, Courtney Clonch, Scarlett Bermingham, Andrew Loviska, David E. Frank, Ann Bronston, Stephen Christopher Marshall and Karen Kalensky - PHOTO BY PAUL M. RUBENSTEIN
  • Photo by Paul M. Rubenstein
  • George Villas, left, Courtney Clonch, Scarlett Bermingham, Andrew Loviska, David E. Frank, Ann Bronston, Stephen Christopher Marshall and Karen Kalensky
Known for its avant-garde and absurdist fare, City Garage takes a turn for the slightly more naturalistic with its current offering, When the Rain Stops Falling, from Australian playwright and screenwriter Andrew Bovell. But only slightly. Bovell’s widely produced award-winning play skips back and forth in time, providing familial filaments in two-character scenes that are eventually woven into a multi-generational saga of fathers and sons, loss and longing, secrets and regrets.

Gabriel Law (Andrew Loviska), who is tired of his mum Elizabeth’s (Ann Bronston) fish soup and the off-white walls of her small London flat in 1988, sets out for Australia to trace the steps of his long-missing father Henry (George Villas). There, on the Coorong, he becomes involved with local girl Gabrielle York (Scarlett Bermingham). Though their affair remains brief, the ripples of it travel backward and forward through scenes involving Henry and younger Elizabeth (Courtney Clonch) in 1960s London, older Gabrielle (Karen Kalensky) and her husband Joe (Stephen Christopher Marshall) in Adelaide in 2013, and Gabriel York (son of Gabriel Law and Gabrielle York, played by David E. Frank) and his own estranged son Andrew (Loviska) in Alice Springs in 2039. Present throughout these interactions are the nonstop rain and fish soup, as well as echoed lines and metaphors.

More »

Now Trending

Los Angeles Concert Tickets