Stage Raw: L.A.'s own "Golden Gate" to be drug store? | Public Spectacle | Los Angeles | Los Angeles News and Events | LA Weekly
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Stage Raw

Stage Raw: L.A.'s own "Golden Gate" to be drug store?

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Wed, May 13, 2009 at 11:09 AM

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The latest NEW THEATER REVIEWS are embedded in this week's COMPREHENSIVE THEATER LISTINGS; also, see this week's THEATER FEATURE on Kevin King's The Idea Man


L.A.'S OWN "GOLDEN GATE"

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Left photo by  William Gabel, 1965; Right photo, 1998, by RoadsidePeek.com


Update May 13, 2 p.m. from Anita Guttierez, L.A. County Planning Commission re the 9 a.m. hearing:


"The Commission requested additional information be analyzed in the

[Environmental Impact Report], and continued the case until Aug 19,

2009."


The Golden Gate Theatre, a 1,454-seat movie palace built in 1927, on Whitter and Atlantic boulevards in unincorporated East L.A., faces a possible renovation, which would include removal of the theatre's interior features for use by a retail pharmacy. The Los Angeles Regional Planning Commission is holding a hearing on the project today, May 13.

The Spanish Churrigueresque-style theatre was built by developer Peter Snyder, known as the "Father of the East Side." 


Golden Gate (continued)

It was designed by William and Clifford Balch, who also participated in

the design of the El Rey Theatre on Wilshire Boulevard and the Fox

Theatre in Pomona.  The Vega Building, a historic retail building that

once surrounded the theatre, suffered damage from the Whittier

Earthquake and was demolished in the early 1990s.

The Golden

Gate Theatre is one of a handful of neighborhood movie palaces from the

1920s that remain in Southern California, and is the sole remaining

intact neighborhood movie palace in East Los Angeles.

The Los

Angeles Conservancy has objected to the proposed removal and covering

over of interior features, leaving the space virtually unrecognizable

as a theater, and also threatening its listing in the National Register

of Historic Places.  The Conservancy has requested changes to the

design that would leave the interior intact and visible to the public,

and has also urged the developer to seriously consider other, more

compatible community-oriented uses - such as a  live theater,

restaurant or club use, or use as an assembly space for religious

congregations. 


 

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