Voter Cheat Sheet — Prop. 60 Puts Condoms In Porn; Prop. 64 Legalizes Recreational Marijuana

Some hardcore p ... politics awaits you on Nov. 8.
Some hardcore p ... politics awaits you on Nov. 8.
Gustavo Turner/L.A. Weekly

Before Angelenos head to the polls on Nov. 8, we are breaking down the ballot into some quick reads to get you up to speed on what's up for a vote. Read more about the other propositions here.

Proposition 60: Condoms in Adult Video

The initiative, sponsored by L.A.'s AIDS Healthcare Foundation, would codify state and federal protections for adult performers on set. The state Division of Occupational Safety and Health, aka Cal/OSHA, says workers should not be exposed to potential blood-borne pathogens at work. Therefore, condoms are required in porn, it says. However, the rule has been hard to enforce. Typically those who want to make an issue of violators find video and send it to Cal/OSHA with a written complaint. An investigation is launched, and many months later a producer might or might not be fined — the cost of doing business. So AHF is proposing through Proposition 60 that "distributors and agents" are "potentially liable for violations of some adult film workplace rules," according to the California Legislative Analyst's Office.

The measure expands the time a complaint can be filed, from six months to a year. And "the measure makes adult film distributors and talent agents potentially liable for workplace health and safety violations placed into law by this measure," the LAO's nonpartisan analysis states. A huge point of contention is whether everyday fans could sue over condom violations. The LAO says yes, but in limited situations:

"Under the measure, any California resident could request Cal/OSHA to address some alleged adult film workplace health and safety violations," according to the office. "If Cal/OSHA does not take certain actions within specific time frames, that person could file a civil action against the adult film producer."

Proposition 64: Recreational Marijuana

Organizers behind a 2010 initiative tried and failed to legalize recreational marijuana in the Golden State, so Colorado got all the attention when voters passed a similar measure two years later. Now decriminalization activists and other pro-pot groups are uniting behind Proposition 64, which would legalize holding up to an ounce of pot in California for those 21 and older. It would create or remix California cannabis bureaucracy (similar medical marijuana regulations kick in in 2018), tax retail weed at 15 percent and continue to outlaw toking in public. 

The state Legislative Analyst's Office says taxes generated by legalization could amount to $1 billion a year. Most of it would go to youth programs, cleaning up environmental damage caused by cultivation, and programs designed to reduce stoned driving.

Opponents say it would allow marijuana sellers to advertise their wares on television during times when children are watching. While that's technically true, proponents say Federal Communications Commission rules prohibit illicit-drug advertising and that any outlet that would allow it would risk losing its FCC license.

The proposition would continue to allow cities to ban or strictly limit the number of cannabis retailers in town. In Los Angeles, it seems likely that many of the 135 or fewer medical shops granted limited legal immunity by voters in 2013 would transition to recreational sales.


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