What Do the Results of the Los Angeles Elections Really Mean?

The March 7 Los Angeles election results aren't just a tallying of votes — they're a method by which to tap into the larger conscience of the city. What do the results really mean? That the massive defeat of Measure S is "a significant break with 50 years of resistance to growth in Los Angeles," that pro charter-school sentiments could be holding say over LAUSD and that voters are ready to embrace retail marijuana more than ever.

Here are the L.A. Weekly stories that delved into the election results.

The Crushing Defeat of Measure S Is a Defining Moment for L.A.

The election this week revolved, in so many ways, around development. There was Measure S, the controversial anti-development ballot measure, but also the mayor and City Council races, in which the incumbents were attacked, time and again, for allowing density in L.A. It's no exaggeration to say the election was a referendum on development, on density, on urbanization. And density won.

Read the full L.A. Weekly article here.

Angelenos headed to the polls March 7 to vote on development in the city, the influx of recreational and medical marijuana businesses, and money to help the homeless.
Angelenos headed to the polls March 7 to vote on development in the city, the influx of recreational and medical marijuana businesses, and money to help the homeless.
Hillel Aron/Star Foreman/Ted Soqui

Los Angeles Election Results: Down With NIMBYs and a Win for Weed

If you're among the few registered voters in L.A. who cast ballots in the March 7 Los Angeles election, bravo. Your voice was heard on matters as monumental as the future of development in the city, the influence of charter schools on LAUSD and the influx of recreational and medical marijuana businesses.

Read the full L.A. Weekly article here.

What Do the Results of the Los Angeles Elections Really Mean?
Nanette Gonzales

L.A.'s New Pot Era Begins With Debate Over the Number of Shops

Los Angeles voters this week finally said yes to fully legalizing marijuana dispensaries. Measure M passed with a whopping 79 percent in favor. Now comes the hard part: figuring out how many dispensaries beyond the city's current 135 should be legalized, deciding whether to allow delivery apps like Speed Weed to operate within city limits and determining how to regulate growers.

Read the full L.A. Weekly article here.

Clockwise from top left: challenger Nick Melvoin, candidate Kelly Fitzpatrick-Gonez, candidate Imelda Padilla and incumbent Steve Zimmer
Clockwise from top left: challenger Nick Melvoin, candidate Kelly Fitzpatrick-Gonez, candidate Imelda Padilla and incumbent Steve Zimmer

A Pro-Charter Majority on the LAUSD School Board Is Within Reach

It's official: The election for LAUSD school board on Tuesday was the most expensive LAUSD election yet. And despite all that money, there's not even a final resolution; two of the three races are headed for a runoff in May, in which charter supporters will seek to tip the balance of the school board to a pro-charter majority.

Read the full L.A. Weekly article here.


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