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Sex, Lie Detectors and Videotape: Anand Jon Takes Polygraph Test AFTER Conviction -- Supporters Ask Rape Victim to Do Same


Sex, Lie Detectors and Videotape: Anand Jon Takes Polygraph Test AFTER Conviction -- Supporters Ask Rape Victim to Do Same

As we reported here two weeks ago, L.A. fashion designer Anand Jon Alexander, who was convicted November 13 of 16 charges of sexual assault upon young women and girls, including one count of rape, passed a polygraph test during a session in which he was asked two questions. Those queries, which were blacked out in copies sent to the media, centered on a victim known in court as Jessie B.

Before the Fall: Anand Jon

(photo from anandjon.org)

The results of the lie detector test triggered a wave of debate in the blogosphere, with Jon's supporters demanding that Jessie B herself now take a similar test. There are serious questions, however, about the timing of the test taken by Anand Jon, as his fashion label is called.

"Prosecution lie detector tests are not admissible in court," says USC law professor Jean Rosenbluth, "but the defense usually uses them to convince prosecutors not to go ahead with a case, or to drop some charges or to go with lesser ones."

But Jon took his test after he was found guilty.

Rosenbluth, a former federal prosecutor, says that the results of Jon's test might mitigate the sentence he is scheduled to receive from Judge David Wesley next month. (Following a trial that featured emotional testimony by seven victims, along with videotape of some of Jon's behavior, Jon faces life in prison with parole only after serving 67 years.) And, while Jon's lawyers have pledge to appeal his convictions, Rosenbluth points out that successful appeals are rare.


"You gotta produce new evidence," Rosenbluth says. "He could've taken this test before -- it's not going to get him very far."

Meanwhile, Jon's supporters continue to call for Jessie B to take a polygraph test.

"It does sound like a PR war," says Rosenbluth. "She testified under oath, she's already subject to perjury charges."

While there's no legal basis to force Jessie B to take such a test, Rosenbluth notes that prosecutors could file charges against her if they believed she lied or obstructed justice. But that seldom happens and Rosenbluth feels that here the possibility is remote.

"That's why we have juries to listen to testimony -- to reach a verdict," she says.