Proposition 15 fails miserably because California voters can't stomach paying to elect jerks

Wow, California voters really, really hate Proposition 15 and the idea of publicly financing political campaigns, despite the $105 million spent by Meg Whitman and Steve Poizner, and the up to $300 million Jerry Brown and Whitman will now spend thrashing each other.

Whose cash gets eaten?
Whose cash gets eaten?
littlestar.info

The big Dem blogs like firedoglake quickly blamed Republican voters in California today, saying too many GOPs went to the polls due to excitement over Whitman and Carly Fiorina, and thus skewed the outcome of the huge loser yesterday, Proposition 15.

That's bull. Here's what good-government types don't seem to get about California:

Prop. 15 lost on June 8, 2010 in a landslide, 42.5 percent to 57.5 percent.

You need a lot of Democrats and "decline to state" independent voters saying NO to lose by such a whopping margin.

For a long time, California voters have recoiled at using taxpayer money on campaigns to help elect a bunch of a-holes.

Voters don't like it, even if it could somehow prevent the wholly-owned California State Legislature from being ordered around by Big Pharma, Big Insurance, Big Labor, Big Finance, Big Tribal Gaming, Big Trial Lawyers.

This is because the arrogant backers of public finance of campaigns cling to a whiny narrative in which voters should just simply see their amazing wisdom and agree with them.

A sure way to lose in California.

The do-gooders never say upfront: "We know we are asking you to help publicize the campaigns of a-holes who you don't trust, but here's why it is better to elect these a-holes on your dime instead of on Big Tobacco's dime."

Californians will keep rejecting public campaign finance until Prop. 15 style do-gooders speak honestly about the creepy thing they are asking taxpayers to do.

Instead of terrible ballot names like the "California Fair Elections Act" try out "Elect A-Holes Who Owe You Act."

Then, voters might reward their honesty.


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