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Porn Stars Are Personally Begging a Politician to Stop His Condom Bill

Porn Stars Are Personally Begging a Politician to Stop His Condom Bill
The delegation, courtesy of its organizers

If a bunch of porn stars showed up at your place of work and begged you to do something, we bet you would.

A contingent of adult performers visited the office of L.A.-based state Assemblyman Isadore Hall to personally ask him to back off of his bill to make condom use in porn mandatory across the state of California.

See also: Porn's Condom Law Approved by California Assembly

The group included Nina Hartley, Anikka Albright, Mia Li and Alex Chance, we were told by an organizer:

A district director greeted the performers and said their concerns would be sent up the, er, flagpole to Hall.

The delegation also delivered to the assemblyman's office a petition signed by more than 600 porn stars. It also asks him to withdraw the legislation known as AB 1576.

According to the language of the petition:

We have serious concerns about the ways in which this bill violates our privacy, strips us of our rights, and criminalizes our work without addressing any of our actual labor issues. This bill will in fact deteriorate the safety protections we now have in place.

The bill is supported by the AIDS Healthcare Foundation, which has been working to make condoms the law in porn. The organization was successful in getting mandatory prophylactic rules enacted for adult video production in most of L.A. County.

AHF argues that performers are protected by the same federal law, which seeks to shield employees from blood-borne pathogens at workplaces, that covers the rest of us on the job.

The industry has said that consumers don't want to see condom porn and that requiring prophylactics would send production out-of-state and underground, where conditions for sex workers would be more dangerous. The business says its twice-a-month STD testing for porn stars works.

Performer Lorelei Lee had this to say:

Hall, in his words and behavior at the Capitol, in his use of shaming rhetoric, has been utterly dismissive of performer input. But we will not be shamed or cowed into voicelessly allowing this bill to legislate our bodies, our privacy, or our safety. Performers are not being heard by Hall. We are not being heard by many in the Capitol. If they refuse to listen to us, we will show up on their doorstep, we will speak out until they recognize the legitimacy of our voices. 

We reached out to Hall's office for its response but had yet to hear back.

Send feedback and tips to the author. Follow Dennis Romero on Twitter at @dennisjromero. Follow LA Weekly News on Twitter at @laweeklynews.


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