Porn Gets Back to Business After HIV Scare

Porn Gets Back to Business After HIV Scare
Porn's AVN awards via Nate "Igor" Smith/L.A. Weekly

The L.A.-based porn industry was ordered back to work this week after about a five-day production shut-down prompted by a report of HIV that was possibly contracted on-set.

The question of whether or not HIV was actually contracted has not been answered by adult video trade group Free Speech Coalition.

See also: Porn Production Halted as a Report of On-Set HIV Is Investigated

But it did say "precautionary testing has been completed and there is a medical determination that the performer pool has not been compromised." What does that mean?

It means, apparently, that Canoga Park-based FSC doesn't believe that this is cause for alarm.

The organization, which asked producers to take a break from Wednesday to Monday, said yesterday that "the production hold from last week has been lifted, and production can continue effective immediately."

The HIV scare involved an "out-of-state" performer, the organization said. It was notified by health officials of the possible positive, the FSC said last week.

We reached out to Nevada state health officials—following rumors that the performer in question had worked in the Vegas area—to see if they had a record of such an HIV positive, but a spokesman said such information was private.

The industry has been criticized by the L.A.-based AIDS Healthcare Foundation for its refusal to adopt condom use on-set. 

The AHF sponsored a successful ballot measure in L.A. county that has made condoms the law for adult video locally, and it attempted to do so with statewide legislation that failed during the last session in Sacramento.

The industry argues that consumers don't want to see condoms, and that legislating them will only force production out of state and underground, where it would be even less safe.

AHF says all employees should be protected from blood-borne pathogens at the workplace.

The adult biz says its voluntary, twice-a-month testing works by catching reports of STDs early. Production moratoriums have become a fairly regular part of the industry in recent years as FSC officials hope to contain possible outbreaks.

So far they've been fairly successful, or lucky, depending on how you see it. FSC chief Diane Duke had this to say:

We know that production holds and moratoriums are difficult for performers and producers, but they are integral to the safety of the PASS performer pool. 

Send feedback and tips to the author. Follow Dennis Romero on Twitter at @dennisjromero. Follow LA Weekly News on Twitter at @laweeklynews.


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