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Lindsay Lohan Theft Case Ends in One Judgement Already: The New 'It' Dress is Tight, White and Outta Sight

You might think that Lindsay Lohan's time in the spotlight recently would cause Americans to pause about the ethics of theft, the evils of drinking and driving or the dedication required to fully rehabilitate one's self. Nope.

It has actually been an occasion to take style notes and do some online shopping. (The American economy thanks you, Lindsay. You're a one-woman recession buster, and we're not just talking about your personal contributions to the local delivery boys).

That tight white number Lohan wore to court this week has become the new "it" dress across the land. So much so that ...

... online boutiques have sold out of Kimberly Ovitz's $575 number.

That's right, as a convict headed back to court to face a felony theft charge, young (and hopefully in-shape) women across America saw her high-heeled march of shame and thought to themselves ... wow, I want to look like that!

The hottest white dress since Marilyn Monroe found a New York subway grate in 1955.
The hottest white dress since Marilyn Monroe found a New York subway grate in 1955.
Ted Soqui

And who could blame them. The dress was pretty tight, even if Lohan's defense case isn't. (She's been accused of walking out of a Venice jewelry store while still wearing a $2,500 necklace she had tried on).

Lohan, for one, is sick of all the focus on her fashion. She tweeted, before apparently taking it down, " ... What I wear to court shouldnt be front page news. It's just absurd. God bless xox L.''

Because when you want to, er, LiLo, you paint on a blazing-white dress and head to the biggest media event outside Egypt in the blasting California sun as cameras pop off like champagne at a Diddy party.

Sorry for taking a peep, Lindsay. Won't happen again, we promise.

Lohan might not be the smartest celebutante in Hollywood (police were about to pounce on her, er, well-stocked, we're sure, home in Venice when she finally had that necklace returned), but we'll give her mad credit for figuring this out:

Justice is not blind.