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Fearing California Condom Law, Kink Porn Studio Opens Facilities in Vegas

Fearing California Condom Law, Kink Porn Studio Opens Facilities in Vegas
Keith Plocek/L.A. Weekly

California porn studio Kink.com, which last year came under scrutiny for a condom-free production in which a woman who afterward turned up HIV-positive had performed, said this week that it's opening facilities in Las Vegas.

The company, which was investigated by the California Division of Occupational Safety and Health (Cal/OSHA) following the August HIV scare, says it's preparing for the possibility of mandatory condom use for adult video in the Golden State.

See also: Porn Scene Involving HIV+ Performer Investigated by State

In a statement, the company says the opening of production and office space would pave the way ...

 ... for the world’s largest fetish entertainment company to move additional production out of its San Francisco Armory headquarters, should the controversial [condom bill] AB1576 condom bill pass the California state Senate next month.

Kink says it has already wrapped up a couple "movies" in Las Vegas with no trouble from local authorities.

The making of adult video is expressly legal in California even though it involves the exchange of money for sex. That has made it difficult for companies move, despite threats to do so. And while prostitution is legal in some parts of Nevada, that's not the case in Las Vegas. State law there has not legalized porn production, either.

Kink founder Peter Acworth says a few other adult studios, including Brazzers and Bluebird Films, have established a presence in Sin City:

Vegas is looking more and more attractive as time goes by. The cost of doing business out there is lower. The resources are slowly moving there. It’s becoming easier and easier to do business … I think that a lot of companies are doing what we’re doing. They’re setting up satellite offices and getting their feet wet with Vegas as a potential place to shoot.

Mandatory condom use for porn is already the law for most of Los Angeles County. Now the aforementioned bill by local state Assemblyman Isadore Hall would require prophylactics in adult video across California.

The legislation was passed by the Assembly in spring and is now working it's way through the state Senate.

"We don’t want to move out of California," Acworth said, "but we will if we have to. This bill not only denies performers' choice, it would effectively render most existing adult film production illegal."

Send feedback and tips to the author. Follow Dennis Romero on Twitter at @dennisjromero. Follow LA Weekly News on Twitter at @laweeklynews.


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