College 'Transfer Reform' Passes In California Legislature, Aims To Fast-Track The 'Six-Year Degree'

How many thousands of students went to community college for two years only to learn that they practically had to start over again after transferring to a Cal State or University of California campus because many of the classes they took didn't count at the big-league schools? (We don't know the answer; we didn't make the transfer).

But seriously, the budget-challenged state legislature actually did something constructive this summer, passing a "transfer reform" package of bills that would guarantee junior status at Cal State schools for community college students who complete a 60-unit program, according to a statement from the nonprofit Campaign for College Opportunity.

The bills would also prod the UC system to developer a similar "pathway" for transfer students, according the campaign. The package still needs to be signed by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger to become law.

The bills, SB 1440 and AB 2303, were sponsored by Van Nuys-based Sen. Alex Padilla and Assemblyman Paul Fong of Cupertino, respectively.

"This is historic," stated Padilla. "SB 1440 will fundamentally change higher education in California. SB 1440 will better align our higher education system, saving students time, money and freeing up state resources to serve more students."

No more six-year degrees? We'll see.


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