Cecil Hotel Downtown Sued Over Alleged Bed Bugs

Cecil Hotel Downtown Sued Over Alleged Bed Bugs
The Cecil via Google Maps.

It's the place where a woman's body was found in a rooftop tank that feeds the water supply. One reviewer called it "a nightmare on Main Street." We're talking about the Cecil Hotel (a.k.a. Stay on Main) at 640 S. Main St. downtown.

See also: Elisa Lam: Body On Roof Of DTLA's Cecil Hotel Said To Be That Of Missing Tourist.

And now some former customers are suing because, according to their filing, bed bugs bit them and sucked their blood.

Juan Tan and Brenda Hopwood are the main plaintiffs in the L.A. Superior Court suit against Cecil Hotel Management, Inc.

Attorney Brian Virag told us there are could end up being a half dozen plaintiffs or more. "We have a number of clients, he said.

According to the suit:

The bed bugs latched onto the plaintiffs while they slept, sucked their blood until they were gorged and resisted eradication.

... Plaintiffs suffered from numerous bites, which cause pain, discomfort, annoyance, nausea, sleeplessness, inconvenience, humiliation, anxiety and emotional distress.

What's worse, the filing alleges, is that the Cecil knew about the problem (online complaints alleging bed bugs have been in rooms go back years) and didn't do enough to solve it.

"Even if you found them they should do something about them," Virag told the Weekly. "I've got some of the most disgusting pictures."

Though no dollar amount has been attached to the suit, it was categorized as having a potential for more than $25,000 in damages, he said.

Tan stayed overnight in January 2012, the suit says; Hopwood was there in October of the same year.

The Cecil has not responded to the claims.

The parents of Elisa Lam, a 21-year-old tourist from Canada whose body was found in the tank last year, also sued the hotel, in their case for allegedly failing to make the premises safe from hazards.

See also: Elisa Lam's Strange Death Ruled an Accidental Drowning; She Was Bipolar.

The woman apparently wandered onto the locked roof and ended up in the tank. The coroner's office ruled her death an accidental drowning and noted that Lam was bipolar.

With reporting from City News Service. Send feedback and tips to the author. Follow Dennis Romero on Twitter at @dennisjromero. Follow LA Weekly News on Twitter at @laweeklynews.

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