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Angelenos Support Sales Tax Hike to Fix Streets, Survey Says

Angelenos Support Sales Tax Hike to Fix Streets, Survey Says

Honora Talbott/YouTube

We would have guessed that you, a typical Angeleno, have tax fatigue by now. California has been rated one of the highest-tax states in the nation. And it wasn't that long ago, in 2008, that you approved a half-cent sales tax hike to fund our subway expansion and other transportation needs.

See also: L.A.'s Failed Streets: City Hall Wonks Seek Sales Tax Hike on Residents

And still we have the worst roads in the nation. Our sidewalks are more cracked up than Lamar Odom. So it would appear that city leaders are coming at you again to treat you like a virtual ATM. City Hall is considering a proposal to put another half-cent sales tax, to fix local streets and sidewalks, on the ballot.

And you know what? You're okay with it:

A new Loyola Marymount University survey called "Forecast LA" found that 64.7 percent of city residents polled would support a tax increase to pay for "street improvements," a campus spokesman told us.

The survey found that 59 percent of residents countywide would support a sales tax increase for road repair and improvements. Only education was the subject of more support (72 percent countywide) regarding a possible sales tax increase.

However: In both cases the folks polled were not necessarily registered voters. If those folks were polled, the support might be lower. But that's just our guess.

Latinos (73 percent) were the biggest supporters of using a sales tax increase to fix the streets, according to LMU. Whites saw the lowest support (45 percent).

See also: Video Spoofs Sorry State of L.A.'s Sidewalks

Sixty of the 88 mayors in L.A. county were also surveyed. When you hear Eric Garcetti endorse a sales tax hike (he hasn't, yet), be sure to remember this finding from LMU:

 ... When asked to rank their priorities from over twenty selected issues, mayors ranked reducing crime first, followed by developing new redevelopment alternatives, increasing retail services, providing job opportunities, and - tied for fifth priority - improving public education and improving quality of streets. 

Yeah, fixing streets ranks last. But it's cool if you want to pay extra for it.

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Follow Dennis Romero on Twitter at @dennisjromero. Follow LA Weekly News on Twitter at @laweeklynews.