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Anand Jon's Lie Detector Test


Last month bicoastal fashion designer Anand Jon Alexander was convicted by an L.A. jury of most of his 23 sexual assault charges stemming from his conduct with seven young women and underage girls between 2001 and 2007. (Charges involving two additional accusers were thrown out. An earlier version of this blog stated that Jon's convictions involved all nine.) While Jon will not be sentenced until January 13

at the earliest, Deputy District Attorney Frances Young, who co-prosecuted the trial, has said he will not be eligible for parole for 67 years.

Apparently fearing he has nothing to lose (he also faces trials in New York and Texas), Jon submitted to a polygraph test December 2, in which he was asked three specific questions pertaining to the rape of the woman known in court as "Jessie B," for which he was convicted on November 13.

                                                                                                   (AP/Worldwide)



I say "specific," yet have no definite idea what the exact questions

were -- they were blacked out on the emailed copy of the exam that I

received. The exam was administered by JoMac and Associates of

Glendale. The letter from JoMac to a Jon defense team investigator says

that after Jon was given some control questions to answer, he then

answered the three Jessie B rape questions. The letter from JoMac concludes,

"After a careful evaluation of all

physiological changes and a

numerical analysis of all test results, it is the opinion of the

examiner . . . that Mr. Alexander did not show criteria that is

indicative of deception on any of the relevant questions and passed the

test."

Lie detector tests aren't admissible in court as evidence and the above

JoMac statement is about as close as polygraph exam administrators can

come to claiming a person is telling the truth -- or at least, is not lying. However, taking the test after

the trial seems like putting the cart before the horse -- or is it

closing the barn door after the horses have left? In any event, Jon's

defense is clearly taking any victories it can as it prepares its appeal of his

conviction.

(Polygraph image Lafayette Instrument)


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