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The Best Concerts to See in L.A. This Weekend

Eric Prydz -- See Saturday
Eric Prydz -- See Saturday
Photo courtesy of Infamous PR

Friday, November 8

Nine Inch Nails

STAPLES CENTER

There's an elephant in the room, and it's Trent Reznor's happiness. The industrial electronic legend's latest album with Nine Inch Nails, Hesitation Marks, came out in September on the heels of five years of silence from NIN. For Reznor, those years included two successful film soundtracks, a Grammy, an Oscar, a Golden Globe, a moderately acclaimed side project (How to Destroy Angels), a stunning wife and two sons. This is his beautiful house. This is his beautiful wife. This last album could have been a disaster. But if Nine Inch Nails' eighth full-length betrays anything, it's the dynamism driving Reznor. The master of touching nerves might be personally content, but creatively, the fire is still burning, even if the wounds are no longer raw. Thanks in part to the band returning to a major label and Reznor exchanging cargos for tuxedos more frequently, no longer is anyone biting the hand that feeds them, and that's just fine. --Kelsey Whipple

See also: Hopes of Seeing Nine Inch Nails One Last Time Pushes Me Forward

The Telescopes

THE SMELL

Britain's Telescopes haven't quite done it all, but they've done the hard stuff and the heavy stuff and the heady stuff, too. As heard on their kinda-best-of collection As Approved by the Committee, they start in the late '80s with Ron Asheton-style guitar hell-rock, then shift to blissed-out psychedelia, the sound that would power their still-affecting 1992 album on the storied Creation label. Then, after 10 years with little communication, The Telescopes returned in 2002 with two founding members and an infinite number of effects pedals, making (very loud) noise that felt like a revelation. (The Wire calls this their "post-riff" era.) Their latest release helmed by founder Stephen Lawrie is two "Sweet Sister Ray"-style tracks recorded at Echo Park's own Bedrock Rehearsal for Part Time Punks Radio. It's music for some, medicine for others. Also Saturday, Nov. 9, at the Echo Country Outpost and Sunday, Nov. 10, at the Complex. --Chris Ziegler

Saturday, November 9

Eric Prydz

HOLLYWOOD PALLADIUM

Eric Prydz has worked under many names (Cirez D, The Dukes of Sluca, Hardform, Pryda, Moo, AxEr), but on his new Epic 2.0 tour, the Swedish house DJ will actually change forms, in a manner of speaking. His show is loaded with visuals, including lasers, extensive animation and what is reportedly the first extensive use of 3-D holograms at a dance-music event. Prydz's likeness was transformed into holograms through laser-scanning technology and will be beamed throughout the room. The DJ has previously performed Epic a handful of times in the U.K. but is bringing it to the United States for the first time on this brief, three-city tour. Due to the ephemeral nature of the program, Prydz insists that Epic 2.0 should be seen now -- before the restless sonic mixer changes things up yet again. --Falling James

Bass Player Live!

THE FONDA THEATRE

Specialist events for six-string shredders are commonplace, but gatherings of bassists, those oft-overlooked bottom-feeders of rock & roll, are rarer than a decent drum solo. This all-star concert and awards show, the highlight of two days of clinics and exhibitions (mostly at nearby SIR Studios), leans decidedly toward hard rock's low end. Black Sabbath's deceptively fleet-fingered Geezer Butler (alleged utterer of the much-quoted "We're only in it for the volume"), Laguna Beach rockabilly royalty Lee Rocker (Stray Cats) and 26-year-old Aussie fem-phenom Tal Wilkenfeld (Jeff Beck) will be honored, while performers include the very metal Rex Brown (Pantera), Frank Bello (Anthrax), Blasko (Ozzy Osbourne) and Dave Ellefson (Megadeth). Bring earplugs. Or not. --Paul Rogers

See also: The Top Ten Ozzy-Era Black Sabbath Songs That Aren't "Paranoid" or "Iron Man"

 

Sunday, November 10

Fool's Gold Presents Day Off

SHRINE AUDITORIUM

With multiple headliner festivals often costing hundreds of dollars per ticket, it's a pleasure to have a party featuring top names that's totally free. A-Trak and Nick Catchdubs bring a formidable array of talent associated with their Fool's Gold label -- as well as super-cool talent not associated with their label -- for their second annual Day Off daytime gratis get-together. The filthy rhyming punk rocker of MCs, Danny Brown, and Kanye West's protégé Travi$ Scott bookend Day Off. Sandwiched in between is Australian crowd pleaser Anna Lunoe juxtaposed against the eardrum bulldozer Kill the Noise and his dark vampire bass. Day Off starts in the afternoon and ends at the crest of the evening, allowing you to get to bed at a reasonable hour but stay amped all week. --Lily Moayeri

Of Montreal

THE ECHOPLEX

Of Montreal's 12th album, Lousy With Sylvianbriar, bursts with a typically mad flurry of busy ideas. Leader Kevin Barnes cracks wise like a postmodern Bob Dylan on the bluesy "Belle Glade Missionaries" (where he sneers and snarls lines like "You better send your malaria to puncture their brains"), and he gets positively cryptic on tracks like "Sirens of Your Toxic Spirit" and "Triumph of Disintegration." Meanwhile, the Athens, Ga., group's musical backing wanders from beautiful, Lou Reed-style balladry ("Obsidian Currents") and psychedelic pop ("Colossus") to hazy, country-laced rock ("Amphibian Days") and freaky folk ("Raindrop in My Skull"). Of Montreal's songs are already crazed enough, but the band members are even wilder onstage, appearing in a surreal array of bizarre costumes and headpieces. Also at Largo at the Coronet on Monday, Nov. 11. --Falling James

See also: Kevin Barnes: Of Montreal's Front Man Is Depressed

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