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Dexter Isaac Confesses to 1994 Tupac Shooting that Sparked East-West Coast Hip-Hop Feud

Tupac leaving the hospital after the 1994 shooting
Tupac leaving the hospital after the 1994 shooting

On November 30th, 1994, Tupac Shakur was shot in Manhattan's Quad Studios. The night sparked the East-West coast feud that left legends Tupac and The Notorious B.I.G. both dead less than three years later.

Now, on the eve of Tupac's 40th birthday, Dexter Isaac has confessed to being the shooter on that night in 1994. According to AllHipHop.com, he says he was hired and paid $2,500 by James "Jimmy Henchman" Rosemond, who manages L.A. rapper Game. A fugitive warrant is currently out on Rosemond, who was indicted last month for his alleged involvement in a cocaine distribution ring.

Isaac comes forward to refute a statement Rosemond issued on May 23, 2011 that named Isaac as an informant, claiming that Rosemond, in fact, was the "rat for the government." He then confesses to shooting Tupac, and goes on to say:

Now I would like to clear up a few things, because the statute of limitations if over, and no one can be charged, and I'm just plain tired of listening to your lies ... I'm not going to talk about my friend Biggie's death or 2Pac's death, but I would like to give their mothers some closure. Jimmy, you and Puffy like to come off all innocent-like, but as the saying goes: You can fool some of the people some of the time, but you cannot fool all of the people all of the time. Mr. Rosemond, I ask you: Are you going to flip on Puffy when the feds get you?

Interesting.

The confession is aligned with LA Times reporter Chuck Philips' now-retracted 2008 article that alleged Christopher Wallace (The Notorious B.I.G.) and Sean "Puffy" Combs knew Tupac was being set up.

"They were advised in advance of what was going to happen," Philips told MTV News at the time. "They did not know the assailants were going to be shooting. In fact, [the assailants] were told no shooting. But Tupac pulled a gun, and it went haywire. It was supposed to be a severe beating."

Philips also fingered Rosemond as masterminding the hit, and believed its ultimate goal was to force Tupac into signing with Bad Boy Records.

If Isaac's confession is true, maybe this will be the tugged thread that will unravel the mystery of Tupac and Biggie's still-unsolved deaths.

But we doubt it.


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