Big Like Me (NR)

Documentary 105 min. December 31st, 1969
By Angela Lutz
Greg Bergman's personal trainer is tired of hearing about his client's penis. During workouts, Bergman, a 32-year-old comedian, bitches nonstop about the inadequacy of his dick, from its statistically average length and girth to its inability to please a woman.
This conversation recurs throughout Big Like Me, a comic-obsessive documentary chronicling writer/co-director Bergman's lifelong struggle with body dysmorphia. Bergman talks about his manhood's insufficiency with anyone who will listen: his wife, his mother, strangers on the street. These often one-sided discussions effectively capture the unhealthy nature of Bergman's obsession, but the film's tongue-in-cheek portrayal of his plight as heroic fails to arouse much sympathy.

It's easier to feel sorry for Bergman's wife, who measures his dick every morning after he's tried pills, pumps and stretching devices. It's uncomfortable to watch a man so blatantly wallow in self-consciousness, teetering on the brink of psychological ruin every time he fails to gain a fraction of an inch. After his wife leaves him, Bergman travels to Tijuana for experimental penile enhancement surgery. When he's spread-eagle on the operating table, with doctors jamming needles into his flaccid cock, we finally meet all 5.97 inches of the documentary's true star. It's a telling moment: Bergman's penis is totally fine.


It also becomes apparent that after exploring support groups, therapists and his family history — and discovering that the man with the world's largest penis is self-conscious about his abs, lives in a shitty apartment and enjoys eating soft pretzels — Bergman hasn't learned a damn thing. Still, the film offers an entertaining, awkward look at obsession and perfection, and anyone with body issues is likely to identify with at least some of Bergman's complaints.
Gregory Bergman, Aaron Freese