WHAT DO YOU CALL A FRENCH TROJAN?

Classical WHAT DO YOU CALL A FRENCH TROJAN? French musician Henry Gronnier is one of those rare performers who claims virtuosity on two instruments: piano and violin. Although he's a USC Thornton faculty violinist, if you catch him on YouTube, you'll find him at the piano, accompanying other violinists. He's also a founding member of the acclaimed Rosetti Quartet, for which he plays the violin, and the Rosetti Piano Quartet, for which he also plays the violin, leaving keyboard honors to Israeli piano virtuoso Rina Dokshitsky (a name only the brave would keep). This week, with Dokshitsky Gronnier performs a Thornton School faculty recital that should be a winner. The program includes Mozart's lyrical, delicate Sonata in B-flat Major, KV 454; Beethoven's intensely lovely Sonata in G Major, Op. 96; and Paderewski's fiery, elegant Sonata in A minor, Op. 13. It should be noted that all three of these works are titled "Sonata for Violin and Piano," and with good reason: The technical and interpretive demands are the same for both instruments, and all three were written by composers who were, first and foremost, pianists.
Fri., Feb. 12, 8 p.m., 2010


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