BRIAN MAY BE AN ODDBALL

It's really surprising what rock stars are into when they're not into their rock stardom. Alice Cooper? Late 16th-century French missionaries in Milwaukee. Billy Joel? Fast bikes and satellites. Brian May of Queen? The 1850s stereoscopic photograph series and Weetabix. You just never know. Tonight May signs and presents, along with co-author Elena Vidal, A Village Lost and Found ($60, Frances Lincoln), a book about their hunt for a mysterious, oft-assumed apocryphal, village in Oxfordshire. "Lost" for almost two centuries and known heretofore only from photographer T.R. Williams stereoscope series of 59 "Scenes in Our Village," the village stoked May's imagination and led him on a nearly lifelong search for it using clues from William's "Scenes." It's an illuminating, faded window into the world of Victorian-era England like no other — and May is understandably deeply proud of his detective work, so when you get the book signed, here are some rules to follow: You can only have the book signed (no records or related effluvia), you can't quiz him about writing the music for "The Road Warrior" (wrong, and dead, Brian May), and by all means do not argue with him that fat-bottomed girls really don't make the rockin' world go 'round.
Tue., July 27, 9 p.m., 2010